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In search of some expert advise.  I have a C160 that I wish to bring back the natural "patina" as much as possible without reprinting.  What tried and true methods have been used by other members on their machines?  Thank you all in advance.

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:scratchead:  Depends on how much of the original paint is still present...

have any picts of what you're working with to share here?  

 

:confusion-shrug: In the meantime, see post #6 here...

 

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WD-40 and 0000 Steel Wool is the way to go.

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15 hours ago, 953 nut said:

WD-40 and 0000 Steel Wool is the way to go.

Do you find the oil base of the WD40 tends to collect dust? That's the only thing I question when I see people suggest oil based products. I use engine storage spray on all my snowmobile suspension parts when I store it. it gets dusty, but a few rides through the snow and it cleans it off pretty good.

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5 hours ago, Rob XC700 said:

Do you find the oil base of the WD40 tends to collect dust? That's the only thing I question when I see people suggest oil based products. I use engine storage spray on all my snowmobile suspension parts when I store it. it gets dusty, but a few rides through the snow and it cleans it off pretty good.

 

That's why I went with Matte clear. I love the look of WD but it really attracts dust. The matte clear gives a very similar look and it protects the finish without the getting dirty. Both methods are good. 

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On 8/16/2017 at 9:14 PM, cschannuth said:

I degreased and then used 000 steel wool with Windex to thoroughly clean my 606 roller. Then I put a couple coats of Matte clear coat on everything. It retained the patina without adding unnatural shine that old paint wouldn't have. Plus. It protects the paint well since it's kept inside. 

 

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  I decided to try this and the results were amazing. Being cautious, I took an old seat pan from a 1075 roller. the seat sits directly on the pan and there are deep pits and heavy rust beneath along with paint scratched or worn down to the primer. So, in other words, the patina was from bad to just plain ugly.

Here is what i tried, and I would not change a thing. On the deep pitting, I used a Harbor freight flap sanding disc that was very worn just enough to take off the rust that was sticking up above the surface. If i would have had some 100 grit emery cloth, that might have been better. i followed that up with some 220 grit wet sanding and just went for the correct feel as in not really taking too much off, but " i cannot stand to have high spots of rust sticking up through the paint" kind of feel. the rust pits and scratches will still be there, but where the paint is all there, it will be flat.

 

i followed that with 600 grit and used a light touch and plenty of soap in the water to sort of polish the paint further. the paint starts to show its beauty, but that beauty will not show when it dries. To stabilize the rust, I used a rust oxidizer that contained oxalic acid and kept it wet for 5 minutes or so when you could see the bright areas of metal that all the paint was sanded off turn slightly blue. Then rinse the part and apply just a bit to those areas again. After that dried, I found a few black streaks from the oxidizer in the paint and polished them off with 600 sand paper. You will know when the look of the piece suits you.

 I applied Rustoleum 2X clear to the surface in almost a continuos fashion with a short 2 minute set time. this stuff sets up in a hurry. be careful in high humidity, as a white bloom can cloud the finish. I think that celebrating the battle scars is great on some of your herd. The 2X clear coat is UV stabilized so hopefully, it will last. You can sand the blems off the next day and buff [maybe a few days later] or leave it alone. you can actually handle the piece in an hour and it feels dry, but it is still gassing out a bunch of odor.

 

 i plan to take it a step farther. I did get a little white bloom on one spot, so I will sand it enough to flatten it a little and then hit it with a higher grade of clear so as to deepen the finish and clarity and then not go too far with the buffing. Then it should really look like an oiled finish

 

 The first two pictures are half the pan sanded and half original. the next pictire is rust converter. I then took a bit of black Rusteoleum and wiped it on the really rough stuff and wiped most of it off with thinner. The last two are with the clear on and not yet sanded. That is where I am right now, about 2-3 hours shop time..  Remember this is just an experiment and I would let a real project dry longer . This all got done in 8 hours total including dry times.Thanks to cshannuth for giving me the motivation to try this

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Posted (edited)

 I took the Practice fender project a step or three farther and while I do not want to brag on myself, I just cannot believe what the result was.  First, I sanded the clear more or less flat because i think that gloss clear would lay on nicer than matte and it surely did   A much finer finish.was achieved, but as an experiment, i sanded it a bit with 1200 grit and very soapy water and then 2000 grit, Followed that with meguiars #2 swirl mark remover applied by hand with damp/wet terry cloth.

 

 The results were spooky. The finish was close to a new car in the showroom, but the bumps and flaws in the paint remained. It was like the old sand moulded glass window panes combined with candy paint. 

 

 The pictures [on the next post] really do not do it justice. The depth just does not show.  I did not realize how much smaller the 1075 is compared to a c-series

Edited by ohiofarmer
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