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Posted (edited)

I have been updating my work on my 310-8 on "What have you done to your :wh: today " but thought this needed a separate thread. Plan on putting 8 inch rims on the front and had set of rims with mounted tires . One tire was flat so finally figured out it had bad cracks in the side walls. Had another set of tires that I had gotten a year ago. Removed first tire from rim and mounted new tire. No problem piece of cake. The second tire had a tube so here I go. Broke seal and flipped rim over to break seal so I could remove tube. Only took a 1/2 hour to break seal . Flipped rim over and started pulling out tube. I got a 3rd of tube out and realized I had some of kind of C - - - all over my hands and tube. My guess is a PO had a flat and pickup his can of Fix A Flat or one of the other products on the market. Well it did not work so a tube was installed without cleaning the tire or rim. The tube was basically glued to the tire and rim.  I fought with the tube for an 30 minutes without any success. My redneck background hit high gear , grabbed the Saw all and inserted new blade. 15 minutes later got the bead cut thru on one side flipped rim over and started with a new blade finally after 30 minutes I finally got the tire and tube off the rim. No harm was done to rim during this adventure. Would have taken pictures but there was too much sweat dripping in my eyes. I had the A/C running in the shed the whole time. Tomorrow I will clean the rim both the fix a flat c- - - and the rust that it created.  Life is grand when you are having fun and getting cranky.  

Edited by elcamino/wheelhorse
I can't spell
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Cranky is the new normal! :):handgestures-thumbupright:

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Posted (edited)

I like cranky...  :handgestures-thumbsup:

it's how live gets done. 

 

 

Edited by AMC RULES
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One of these days I will learn how to spell . Sawall  should be Sawzall . I least I know my tools , my spelling just sucks.

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That is why many tire places will not work on tires that have been slimed or will charge you extra

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1 hour ago, stevasaurus said:

Wall Gym...that is a reall inderestin storie.  for dose of us that cann't spel a Saw all is a grate tole.  I loved myne!!  :occasion-xmas:

That took a lot of work to type and even more work to read. I need a nap now!   :sleeping-sleep:

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You can't beat working with a sawzall!

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21 minutes ago, KC9KAS said:

You can't beat working with a sawzall!

TORCH! :banana-jumprope:

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During my high school days I worked part time at a service station. Several times if a customer's tire had picked up a nail I would plug it while it was on the car and send them one their way.

In the spring a regular customer came in to have his snow tires removed and regular tires installed, I deflated one of the tires and broke the bead; couldn't get the tube to come out. I pulled and tugged and finely it came loose but had a hole in it. I removed the tire and discovered a plug had been inserted and it had plugged the tire and tube together. I told the customer that "some dummy" had plugged a tube type tire! He replied, yes, that dummy would be you!   :oops:   Turns out I had noticed the tire had a leak and plugged the tire out at the gas pumps one day while his wife was getting gas. It had held air without any problem all winter. Needless to say I didn't charge him to patch the tube.

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Never plug a tire when the car is on a lift and the hole is eye level. That glue stings! :blink:

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I had the same experience with a tire, took me about four hours to get the tube out. (I didn't have a sawzall!)

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1 hour ago, R. L. Addison said:

I had the same experience with a tire, took me about four hours to get the tube out. (I didn't have a sawzall!)

 

Me. too, but I had a Sawzall, and I went for it after only 15 minutes.  Best tool ever invented.  I use it for trimming trees from a ladder.  Way safer than bringing a chain saw up a ladder!

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@squonk Only a squonk would mention a torch on a story about rubber tires. Insurance adjuster : Can you tell me exactly what happened so we can honor your claim. Bubba ; Me and my buddy have a few beers and we couldn't get a tire off a rim. We tried a torch. It was doing fine until we couldn't see for the black smoke next thing was the fire department was late getting here. 

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Nobody lets me get the "Flame Wrench" out! :(

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Posted (edited)

My grandpa would buy old used surplus tires like the ones used on deuce and a half military trucks. I had the fun job of mounting and fixing them . We used them on manure spreaders and big gravity feed wagons  . Those are some tuff beads :tools-hammerdrill: , especially those old rusty crusty ones that were mounted for decades  . I can remember a couple , a sawzall was the only way they were coming off . Did those military trucks have split rims ? Jim don't worry about the spelling. If my iPad didn't have auto spell and voice text there's no way anyone could understand what I was writing :blink: !

Edited by ACman
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1 minute ago, ACman said:

I my grandpa would buy old used surplus tires like the ones used on deuce and a half military trucks. I had the fun job of mounting and fixing them . We used them on manure spreaders and big gravity feed wagons  . Those are some tuff beads :tools-hammerdrill: , especially those old rusty crusty ones that were mounted for decades  . I can remember a couple , a sawzall was the only way they were coming off . Did those military trucks have split rims ? Jim don't worry about the spelling. If my iPad didn't have auto spell and voice text there's no way anyone could understand what I was writing :blink: !

Some had lock rings..not a true split rim  (My M37 has lock rings..have changed tires an are still here alive) chain them up or use a cage........and some had combat rims (sided bolted together)

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2 minutes ago, pfrederi said:

Some had lock rings..not a true split rim  (My M37 has lock rings..have changed tires an are still here alive) chain them up or use a cage........and some had combat rims (sided bolted together)

 

I had to mount them on regular rims with a tube . Talk about being tuff job :rant2:! We also used chain with locking rings. Thankfully I never seen one come apart !

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36 minutes ago, ACman said:

 

I had to mount them on regular rims with a tube . Talk about being tuff job :rant2:! We also used chain with locking rings. Thankfully I never seen one come apart !

I worked in a heavy truck shop as a teen-ager many years ago, we saw part of a split rim go through the side of our shop one night-next day we had a cage to inflate split rims. Luckily no one was hurt. 

I hated working on tires-still do! Maybe I'll bring them to you from now on Jim :ychain:

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@chip61 please don't do me any favors  . I have had enough fun with this one tire to last awhile. I am sure something that should be easy to do with give me a fight in the near future. Right now the heat and humidity is kicking my behind.

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Yeah, this humidity is kickin' my butt! I had one rag out yesterday to clean parts and another to wipe my face every 5 minutes so I could see. It's high even for Georgia. When the rain came, we were doused for 30 minutes.

 

The 'resort to sawzall technique' explains why dynamite and fishing go together. I never had the patience to fish. just can't buy dynamite at the local Ace anymore.

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I'm with you on the humidity. I live in Upson county. I like the heat but the humidity could come down a bit.

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Posted (edited)

   Actually, a propane torch and a Bobcat with pallet forks are my go-to tools for the worst glued-on tires. I heat the rim in a 12" arc at the bead just until white smoke appears and take a fork to it at just the right angle. Only takes a minute to break the bead and I do not even have to apply enough heat to burn the paint

Edited by ohiofarmer
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I use a Hackzall as my go to tool:handgestures-thumbupright:!  Just a miniature sawsall, but portable!

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