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1979 D200 Voltage rectifer/regulator question

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I have a 1979 D200 Model 91-20KS02.  The PO did some "re-wiring".  When I look at the wiring diagram it shows a rectifier.  The alternator harness from the engine is unhooked and hanging off the tractor.

 

Can someone describe and/or send me a picture of where it should go?

Also, what is the part number for the rectifier?  The toro parts viewer did not show the rectifier.

 

Thank You.

 

 

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Is it a 3 wire flat plug?

If it's a Kohler engine the regulator should look like this the two wires from the engine plug into the two outside terminals and the middle one goes to the positive. Hope this helps

IMG_20170716_212249426.jpg

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Can you spot your starter solenoid? bolted to the frame on the right side near the flywheel, when you spot it look directly across on the inside of the opposite panel bolted to the panel (its kinda tucked in there and not easily visible) If original it will have a 3 terminal conx point, the 2 wires from the flywheel and one from the ignition. The conex point is notorious for getting hot and melting the plastic connector (a Packard 56 version that I cant find anywhere for mine!)

 

Anybody know where this Packard connector can be found, its a 3 place female with 2 flat and 1 on top to the side (not the more common 'pyramid' style)

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The original 15 amp regulator was part number 101450 and used on many models.

The regulator is listed on the Main Electrical System page at the Toro MPV as item 36 near the end of the list.

 

Garry

 

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Garry, thanks.  When I looked at the toro parts viewer I didn't see a drawing for the main electrical system so I did not click on it but I do see now if I click on it, it shows all the part numbers.  The drawing just does not show up.

 

Pacer, thanks.  I will look this evening.  Yes. I do know where the solenoid is. I cleaned the 35+ years of debris that was encasing it yesterday!!!

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Pacer,

I looked this evening and I can see the regulator.  I have no idea why PO unhooked it. The plug coming from the engine is not melted and looks ok to me.  It is a 3 wire plug but it is not flat.  See below.

I guess next step would be to test it with a multi meter. 

 

alternator plug.jpg

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 BMW, yes that is indeed it and it does look OK, but I would strongly suggest to remove the wire ends from the plastic housing/connector and clean them good. They look pretty cruddy and that can cause a poor connection which will cause heat and first thing you know it'll be melted - along with the wiring!

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OK.  That sounds like a great idea.  Still new to this hobby and appreciate the help.  Thanks.

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Just a tip - check around on the net and get a can of DeOxit D5 - it's a go-to solution for audiofile/electronics folks and works far better than any deoxider sold out there , even the decent CRC brand doesn't hold a candle to this stuff . It won't hurt plastics , will remove oxidation and leave a protective layer . It is not cheap , but it also lasts forever since you only use a very small amount and their can/nozzle design is quite well made unlike others . For seriously nasty stuff I do keep a can of D-100 (100% cleaner) around and use it a lot on automotive/equipment connectors that can't be cleaned with mechanical methods . Many sites also sell small kits of 3-5 different connector tools - the small flat tapered one will work nicely on that Packard connector and not destroy the terminal - or a simple ground down pocket screwdriver works as well . I brush what I can with a brass cleaning brush , then hit the inside with the DeOxit D5 - it's never failed once to do it's job in the 20yrs I've used the stuff  .

 

It's on sale right now here - https://www.parts-express.com/caig-deoxit-d5s-6-spray-5-oz-with-perfect-straw--341-200

 

Decent general use terminal tools - https://www.amazon.com/Pico-0660PT-Piece-Weatherpack-Tool/dp/B0002JMYKS/ref=pd_sim_263_8?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=P6GCX5A3N0C0F0HK7NQD

 

 

Sarge

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I would like to know if I can replace a rectifier with a voltage regulator?

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Technically a rectifier just converts AC to DC  a regulator does that and adjusts the output based on the batteries condition (voltage level).  Practically people tend to use the term interchangeably when it comes to small engines. 

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I thought I saw a post about testing regulators but I can't find it now.  How can I test it to make sure it's working correctly?

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Is this an aluminum finned solid state rectifier/regulator or a set of coils and points under a tin cover?

7 minutes ago, BMW1 said:

I thought I saw a post about testing regulators but I can't find it now.  How can I test it to make sure it's working correctly?

A tractor model number and serial number or the numbers off the engine decal should identify which type you have.

 

Garry

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1979 D200 Model 91-20KS02.

It's aluminum finned.  Pictures below

 

20170805_201725.jpg

20170805_201737.jpg

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A week or so ago I posted a procedure for testing a five or six wire Kawasaki regulator I think it was because I had never seen it before. That is likely the one you are thinking of.

The one you have can not be tested. If everything else in the charging system meets the specs and the charging system still does not work it is assumed the regulator has failed.

 

A couple of things I have learned but you won't see in the manuals.

 

One of the regulator's AC terminals is connected directly to the DC terminal inside the regulator. You can verify this using an ohmmeter. If that one AC terminal is rusted off as they sometimes are you can connect one AC wire from the stator to the DC wire and it will work as normal. I does not matter which AC wire goes where. Don't think this will apply to you because your terminals are still there for the most part. Sand the surfaces so the wire terminals get a good clean tight contact. If the regulator now works coat the terminals with dielectric silicone grease so they can not corrode again.

 

The aluminum body of the regulator needs a good ground to the battery negative post. Adding a ground wire to one of the regulator's mounting screws will guarantee that. As these tractors get older the chassis grounds deteriorate.

 

The regulator needs to see the battery voltage before it can regulate the charge current. With the regulator installed back on the tractor and wires connected turn the key to the RUN position with the engine not running. Check the voltage across the battery posts and record it. Now move the red test lead to the DC terminal on the regulator. You should have the same voltage. If not the same voltage the path the charge current takes to get to the battery is compromised and needs to be corrected.

 

I have cleaned the potting material off the regulator and found failed diodes. Was able to replace them for a few cents and still working 20 years later. That regulator was originally mounted with the terminals up. I replaced it with the terminals down thinking the heat it generates would be better dissipated with the aluminum fins above the source of the heat. I don't know how valid that thought is but it still works hours at a time.

 

Garry

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