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Texas Todd

K341 Issues

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10 minutes ago, Texas Todd said:

BAKT4KIDS had a+.040 on fleabay. I have purchased a couple of kits from them over the past year as well with good results

I too have had great results with them, sorry to hear that Searcher60 had a bad experience.

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I have also bought a few parts from them and had no problems.

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Took some pics. The rod has no markings. The piston says Brasil and Mahle on the inside. Means not genuine Kohler to this seasoned investigator.... hah

Not bad camera work for a smartphone, if I do say so myself!

piston.jpg.6720bb3a09a2c49d14fada64c3ab4879.jpg

You can make out the .030 and there is a plus next to it. Brazilians type small!

Rod.jpg.cb371e6712af9e4dd4afe940f93adac7.jpg

59b086ddc608f_Pistoninside2.jpg.d1c9dbbcb269df29b9301b31d094b428.jpg

59b086e2d626b_Pistoninside.jpg.edfc61001d820af6c87277772bf7d4b1.jpg

Thats about all the pics I could come up with.

I am going to rely on my guy at the machine shop once I take it down next week. He is a knowledgeable fellow and at the end of the day, ya gotta have faith in somebody when you are as inept as I.

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That is a the over $200 Mahle piston. I think it lists for $240.  It is listed as the "new style" in Kohler parts books. The rod is not the "new style" rod. Perhaps if you flip the rod over, is there is a number? The Kohler service manual is very clear about mixing THEIR rods and pistons between the old and new style. That rod sorta looks like it got hot. 

 

If that piston was used with the wrist pin that it came with, you would have added over 1 ounce to the weight versus the original piston and pin that a K-341 crankshaft was balanced for originally. The piston weight is ok, the wrist pin that it comes with is where the weight gain is. 

 

As for that eBay seller, my one experience with him was a total disaster. Ask him. I still have his e mails and the eBay e mails.  Ask him if he gives refunds when he screws up, even after the wrong parts that he shipped are returned?????

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Interesting information. I have no clue what the combination is of this disastrous pairing of parts.....I didnt see any numbers on the flip side of the rod, but will look again. 

Sure woulda been simpler if it was a STD piston and I could just have it punched and move on......but not nearly as interesting, eh?

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I don't know sizes but was told over the years, 2nd hand of course, that the pullers bore these motors out and put a 350 sb Chevy piston in the hole. just saying

 

 

 

 

eric j

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8 minutes ago, ericj said:

I don't know sizes but was told over the years, 2nd hand of course, that the pullers bore these motors out and put a 350 sb Chevy piston in the hole. just saying

 

 

 

 

eric j

I think you may have been referring to Brian Miller's post where he compares the Kohler 10, 12 and 14 HP engines and internals to a small block chevy.

http://gardentractorpullingtips.com/engine.htm

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Just now, 953 nut said:

I think you may have been referring to Brian Miller's post where he compares the Kohler 10, 12 and 14 HP engines and internals to a small block chevy.

http://gardentractorpullingtips.com/engine.htm

no I heard that years ago, don't know if there is any truth to it or not. if it is possible I doubt it would last very long, the block would have to be real thin.

 

 

 

 

eric j

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Standard bore for a small block 350 is 4", the largest K is the 16 HP K341 at 3.75". I have no idea what the rod and writ pin size and locations would be but doubt they would be compatible.

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This site will not let me post the link to the Kohler manual with the rod info. Oh well.

Edited by Searcher60

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1 hour ago, Texas Todd said:

Interesting information. I have no clue what the combination is of this disastrous pairing of parts.....I didnt see any numbers on the flip side of the rod, but will look again. 

Sure woulda been simpler if it was a STD piston and I could just have it punched and move on......but not nearly as interesting, eh?

 

I am keeping my eyes open for a WH 341 block as a back-up. Mine is at .030 also. I purchased my tractor from a lying ******* also. (Welcome to America)  I ended up using the Taiwan rod and piston. I really didn't have any choice. Got the assembly weight very close. Only got a few hours on it. But, the vibration is good and it does not smoke or use oil. We will see if she blows.

 

i would not trust anybody. It's all about the cabbage. Machine shops let the trainee's learn on the lawn mowers. 

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Well I have had better luck than bad luck with Wheel Horse folks. Maybe my guy was mistaken. Is what it is. Just hope it turns out okay. Its a hobby, afterall, not my life's work. 

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8 hours ago, Texas Todd said:

Its a hobby, afterall, not my life's work.

Image result for quote of the day                       :text-bravo:

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10 hours ago, Texas Todd said:

 Its a hobby, afterall, not my life's work. 

 

Well said!:text-thankyoublue:

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Yes, it's my hobby also. The last thing I need is a tractor, or the 3 that I have now. I cannot afford screw ups as I am retired and on fixed income. The picture below is what happens when a machine shop cannot follow simple instructions. I still have the tag with the piston clearance they wrote down and wired to the block. but did not bore too. They admitted not boring to right clearance when they checked after seizure. However, they balked at paying for the over $200 Kohler piston that was destroyed by their negligence. I use the current machine shop because about 15 years ago, the other machine shop in town screwed up a jug off my BMW R-90S engine. 

 

I consider this totally my fault because I knew better than to trust any machine shop, any where, anytime, from past experiences.  I have been needing to buy a bore gauge for years to accurately check behind the machine shops. Now, I will not have anything else bored without first buying a bore gauge. People need to realize that this ain't the country it used to be. It's all about the cabbage. Nothing but thieves, crooks and liars. 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1088.JPG

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Many times the customers attitude affects the performance of the shop.  My starter Generator guy and machine shop guy have always been fair to me.

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Sorry to hijack the thread :-)

 

Can anyone recommend a machine shop in the Chicago area. Chicago area is in my book no more than a couple hours drive from chicago :-) Just need to find one that can be trusted 100%.

 

Oh, and where do you fine people buy a bore gauge without breaking the bank?

 

Thanks 

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6 hours ago, Searcher60 said:

Yes, it's my hobby also. The last thing I need is a tractor, or the 3 that I have now. I cannot afford screw ups as I am retired and on fixed income. The picture below is what happens when a machine shop cannot follow simple instructions. I still have the tag with the piston clearance they wrote down and wired to the block. but did not bore too. They admitted not boring to right clearance when they checked after seizure. However, they balked at paying for the over $200 Kohler piston that was destroyed by their negligence. I use the current machine shop because about 15 years ago, the other machine shop in town screwed up a jug off my BMW R-90S engine. 

 

I consider this totally my fault because I knew better than to trust any machine shop, any where, anytime, from past experiences.  I have been needing to buy a bore gauge for years to accurately check behind the machine shops. Now, I will not have anything else bored without first buying a bore gauge. People need to realize that this ain't the country it used to be. It's all about the cabbage. Nothing but thieves, crooks and liars. 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1088.JPG

OUCH!

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4 hours ago, Skipper said:

Sorry to hijack the thread :-)

 

Can anyone recommend a machine shop in the Chicago area. Chicago area is in my book no more than a couple hours drive from chicago :-) Just need to find one that can be trusted 100%.

 

Oh, and where do you fine people buy a bore gauge without breaking the bank?

 

Thanks 

 

I do not know how good it will be, but I just ordered a Fowler off eBay this morning for like $104. Been watching this model for years. I guess you know that it requires micrometers to set it up to check each bore? I like the one I ordered because it goes down to 1.4" and I should be able to check the connecting rod big end on a 1.5" Kohler crankshaft rather than buy plastigage. 

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28 minutes ago, Searcher60 said:

I just ordered a Fowler

The quality of the tool has to be coupled with the skill of the user, lots of practice needed to obtain accurate measurements. Please post your results after you have had the opportunity to become proficient with it.

32 minutes ago, Searcher60 said:

rather than buy plastigage. 

I still like to double check with plastigage.

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My game plan is to take it to the machinist sometime next week and let him measure the bore and crank, since he does that much more often than I and let him help me make the call. I have a micrometer, a bore plunger thingamajig and a nice caliper and I never can get the same reading twice....All I can usually tell for sure is that it is out of spec....They need to invent an automatically adjustable expanding ring to take up up to a quarter inch in bores. Imagine how rich you would be if you invented that. With some of the ingenuity I see on here, I am shocked it hasn't been done....:handgestures-thumbupright:

I am hoping he can turn the crank and bore the old girl (that may not have come out just right :unsure:) even if it costs a little more than I preferred, I can feel better about myself for saving her for hopefully many years to come.

 

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2 hours ago, 953 nut said:

The quality of the tool has to be coupled with the skill of the user, lots of practice needed to obtain accurate measurements. Please post your results after you have had the opportunity to become proficient with it.

I still like to double check with plastigage.

 

Plastigage is great with a round crank. Once the crank is worn and out of round, plastigage is worthless. But, on a freshly turned or new crank it's great. 

1 hour ago, Texas Todd said:

My game plan is to take it to the machinist sometime next week and let him measure the bore and crank, since he does that much more often than I and let him help me make the call. I have a micrometer, a bore plunger thingamajig and a nice caliper and I never can get the same reading twice....All I can usually tell for sure is that it is out of spec....They need to invent an automatically adjustable expanding ring to take up up to a quarter inch in bores. Imagine how rich you would be if you invented that. With some of the ingenuity I see on here, I am shocked it hasn't been done....:handgestures-thumbupright:

I am hoping he can turn the crank and bore the old girl (that may not have come out just right :unsure:) even if it costs a little more than I preferred, I can feel better about myself for saving her for hopefully many years to come.

 

 

Be sure to check ring end gap with the Taiwan rings. The one I just did, the top and oil rings were fine. The middle ring was way to tight. 

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On 9/6/2017 at 7:27 PM, 953 nut said:

I too have had great results with them, sorry to hear that Searcher60 had a bad experience.

I've also had good luck with their kits.

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@Skipper -

Check with Jimmies Motor Rebuilding in Peru, Illinois 61349 - they have an excellent reputation on Kohler engines and never take any short cuts . Old school shop that has been doing this longer than anyone else in the area .

 

It takes a lot of time and work to properly rebuild an air cooled engine - everything changes dimension with heat and getting it right with no noises or issues when cold is not easy . A properly rebuilt Kohler will last nearly as long as it did the first time if done right - most will never hit that mark . I think a lot of the problem is the customer's demands and complaints about cost - good work and parts cost money - a lot of it so in this case you really do get what you pay for .

 

Sarge

 

 

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I used to work in the engine business and there's no reason you can't sleeve a Kohler. We did them occasionally..

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