ohiofarmer

Oh,NO,,, Something broke

24 posts in this topic

Just at the peak of the grass growing like crazy, My favorite mower [Raider10] that I keep at home gave up its rear end. I was mowing up a very steep hill and something snapped--maybe a hub/key or possibly something internal. . I will either have to  donate its motor to an Electro or steal the rear end from my resto project 121. Don't know for today at least

 

  I remain thankful that i have enough mowers at other locations to haul home if need be, but i hate to truck and trailer mowers around when the motorcycle and a key to the storage shed is so much more enjoyable. The plan was to have three horses at three locations and also a spare. I was getting close, but life gets in the way.

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Always look for the simple stuff first. I would first check the Woodruff key for the input shaft. Then check them in the rear axle/hubs. A sheared key in either location will bring you to a halt. 

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 Did not think about the input shaft. Thanks.  If it is more serious, i may be asking which is easier, an engine swap or a transmission swap of an already removed rear end

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Easiest is...    :greetings-clapyellow:

to just bring another :wh: home.

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I personally would repair the Raider tranny, if that is what is needed. BTW :occasion-birthdaymulticolor:

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You certainly have all the help you need to rebuild it and keep your horse quota intact to allow for the 2 wheelin....:auto-sportbike:

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ID: 7   Posted (edited)

If it is a 1970 0r 1971 Raider 10 you should really fix the tranny (#5073)  You will miss the Ltd Slip on the steep hills if you switch to an open differential tranny.

Edited by pfrederi

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Don't forget to check the drive belt and the  idler/tension pulley and spring and the pins in the clutch cross shaft.  Think positive....check all the easy stuff.

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ID: 9   Posted (edited)

 I jacked it up when i got home. All the gears shift and work and drive. I cannot hold the wheels with my hands. when you stop one wheel, the other one spins.

 

 The fact that i cannot hold the wheels with my hands suggests that the input shaft key is gone with some friction left.  i do not have time right now to tear into it as I really need to pick up the514 predator/ 520-H and mow two acres with it before i really get behind. That ,and the Mrs is taking me out for biscuits and gravy for breakfast. I will certainly let you guys know what I find, and I am pretty optimistic that it is on the outside of the transmission. Now I wish that i let the C121 alone in all its patina glory because it ran perfectly.

 

 Pretty disappointed today that the 26 hP Huskee that I keep at the farm has belt issues so i have to mow the big yard/pasture with the 48" deck instead of the 56". I think I remember Taryl saying that the drive belt for an MTD is pretty much a Brand Only MTD if you want it to work properly. I found a video on my kind of transmission. MTD stuff is NOT simple to work on.Like our Horses are.

 

On a positive note that just means that there is more seat time on a proper tractor.Actually, I am down to just one tractor until i wrench on the other ones. You guys are great and I know that I can count on you whatever the problem turns out to be

Edited by ohiofarmer
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That key on the input shaft is a little narrow key and easy to break.

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  Well, i told you that when I knew something that you guys would know as well. The left hub and keyway on the axle shaft is blown.

 

 It looks like all it will take is taking out six bolts and swapping rear ends. Disconnect the clutch at the brake band and possibly the rear end fill tube. Actually it may be more work to get the tractor rear end hung from the ceiling than swapping things out as so many things have to be moved around. Even the mower can stay mounted during the swap

 

 Just gonna mow the two acres first before any more messing around in the shop. Could not get much done today as a lot of phone calls came in for my birthday

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ID: 12   Posted (edited)

ohiofarmer  I have in the past used J.B. weld on these clean every thing up set a  new wood drift key in place apply J.B. on the area just enough to fill hole and keep the key in place. let it harden and  lightly pound hub back on. This works. I did it on my C141 that I had and others that I have had. I belie they did call this Farmers best friend at one time.

Edited by Retierd Wrencher
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That sounds pretty good. I already know what kind of wood I would use and it is Osage Orange. Hard, tough, and it is often used for machinery shims. I also wonder if a steel key could be set with scotch tape on it so as to be removable.. i have use glass bedding to set gun barrels and coated the barrel post with Pam cooking spray with excellent results

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I think wood drift key was meant to be a woodruff key

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Here is the post where I fixed an axle keyway w/o removing it from the transmission.

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ID: 16   Posted (edited)

 That is outstanding. Ed. As for me, With my welding skills I think i will use JB.Weld. The little Raider had snow plow mounts and maybe that explains why the keyways got damaged, Hopefully with just mowing the repair will last 

 

I got the swap out done and IF it is done correctly, it is about ten minutes to remove the six bolts once you figure out which wobble extension to use. Also, i would like to recommend to anyone who has a bit of oil around the transmission to check your bolts for tightness. i think the oil loosens them up and that could cause ruined threads or a cracked frame. Some of the bolts were little more than finger tight plus a quarter turn

 

 i have some pictures of the process including a very dumb mistake [2 actually]  At the minimum you need a cable from above to elevate the frame off the transmission.I did the project alone, but i had a motorcycle lift table that made it a breeze. I can show the pictures when i get the time.

 

 We have been moving the 520 from all three yards to get ahead of the game. the 14 HP predator was under some load in the lot that had not been mowed yet this year with anything from bluegrass to 6" Mammoth clover and it mowed an incredible amount of grass with one gallon of gas .I just took it a bit slower--- so the mower had time to spit it out. I changed two belts on the 26Hp [Briggs} Huskee, but did not have the proper wrench to adjust the drive belt. It will be a three hour job if I have to change that belt. Hopefully I will be back to having the little fleet off the trailer and stored on site for the far flung yards.

 

 You still have to admire the incredible modularity of these Horses. The fact that with experience one can trade transmissions [manual that is] in a half hour or so and not even have to remove the mower says a lot how great the engineering is.

Edited by ohiofarmer

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pfrederi  Thanks that is what meant.

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Epoxy glues like JB Weld are only meant to be a temporary fix to get you out of a pinch. Such high stress areas like a hub/axle connection will not hold up over time. Look at how a Woodruff key and a loose hub will carve out the solid hardened steel of an axle, and the cast iron of a hub. JB is just a form of plastic.

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23 hours ago, rmaynard said:

Epoxy glues like JB Weld are only meant to be a temporary fix to get you out of a pinch. Such high stress areas like a hub/axle connection will not hold up over time. Look at how a Woodruff key and a loose hub will carve out the solid hardened steel of an axle, and the cast iron of a hub. JB is just a form of plastic.

Bob. You may be right for hard and heavy use. But for mowing ? Even if  ohiofarmer  does this  while he finds any parts that he needs. At least he can use  the tractor. I know one that I did is still in service.

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As I said, it may be good for a temporary fix, but I would not trust it for anything that my safety depended upon. :twocents-02cents:

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ID: 21   Posted (edited)

   Update----B)

 

  The big pasture 56" MTD has the transmission belts up and running and new deck belt.. Big time saver, but a gas hog.

 

 Manual transmission swap done and when I add some gear lube --ready to mow. I picked up some GL-5 gear lube in 80-90 and 85-140. There seem to be different opinions on which one is correct for this 8 speed tractor [a Raider10 or Electro 12]      :unsure:

 

 I hope that someone can enlighten me.:techie-eureka:

Edited by ohiofarmer

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Here is enlightenment. This is the Toro Lube & Belt guide. Just look up your year and model in here.    Wheel Horse Lube & Belts.pdf

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For all of my 4-speeds and 8-speeds with the Uni-drive transmission, I use the Walmart gear oil  85W-140, GL-5. It's inexpensive ($12.67) and works great.

85W-140.jpeg.303d5823b0ccc347db6bab0d4e25d37a.jpeg

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ID: 24   Posted

  I finally got the other hub pulled. I bought some 5 inch x 5/16 grade five bolts and used a socket for a pusher Then we added some sockets for the second pull and the hub came free.  The second hub is also unusable as it has wallowed out in the Woodruff key area. This does seem to be a nice gentle way to pull the hubs from the shaft. i just took it easy with one eighth to a quarter turn on each bolt. The pusher is simple to make with a 1-1/16th OD socket and a larger nut. Five 5/16th x five inch grade 5 bolts is what i used for the pull rods.  No reason to ever use a hammer because this stuff is from your shop or any hardware store.

 

 Fortunately, i have some excellent hubs as spares. They cost from 30-40 each. I plan to convert the 1075 from 12 inch rims to eight inch anyway, so the hubs from the 1075 fit the raider anyway.

 

 The good news seems to be that I have an intact transmission internally. I plan to replace all the shaft seals while it is easy to get to. I want five running tractors eventually

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007.jpg

And now it is off and showing the blown hub that I used to pull the other one.  These hubs were abused by a previous owner as he had an attachment for a front blade. I really ought to buy that blade just to have one.

008.jpg

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