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Mastiffman

Harbor Freight welders! Pretty Thorough review and Test!

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You'll be a lot better off with that for sure than a HF welder. 

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I think  so. Not knocking the HF models but I will definitely feel more comfortable with a name brand like Lincoln... 

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Be wary - many of Lincoln's newer lower end models are made in Mexico and use some amazingly cheap components . Post up some pics of the drive roller assembly when it comes in..

 

I've seen some interesting reviews on the newer Everlast welders - they seem to be really upping the game and keeping a really competitive price point .

 

Sarge

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NOW ya Tell me!? Nice! ha ha...

 

I wouldn't call this Lincoln a lower end model. It does have a cast aluminum gear box. Not sure if that helps.

 P.S. How is the front axle rebuild process going? I got a second forward swept front end for my 312-8! :)

EDIT: Attached a photo to help... Shouldn't be too bad?

LIncoln_Welder.jpg

 

Here is the Everlast Power I MIG 200...

 Looks like the same Wire Feed mechanism to me...
Everlast_Power_I_MIG_200.jpg

Edited by Mastiffman

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Yeah - the 200 amp and up machines use a better roller system - thought you were going with the lower sized 140-180 models . Everlast's new 230 model uses a 4-roller design , I believe . Has some interesting features as well...

 

I still prefer the older industrial machines - the old Hobart Beta 200 we had at the shop was an animal and got abused almost daily , never let us down but it weighed almost 600lbs too .

 

The days of heavy built copper wound units are pretty much gone , that explains the used market prices on older equipment that parts can still sourced to repair them . I'm still keeping an eye open for a Lincoln Dialarc 250 stick/tig ac/dc unit but they are going pretty high around here . Love to have one of those , a wire feeder unit and contactor box to boot - that would be the ultimate machine . Shop next door has one - he uses it every day .

 

Sarge

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On 1/19/2017 at 2:26 PM, Mastiffman said:

Okay, so I placed my order for the Lincoln Electric Easy MIG 180dc 2698-1, 

 Should be here next week! 



I bought one of those HF $99 on sale welders. Took it back after one use as it was apparent it didn't have enough power. 

I was wavering between the 140 and 180 Lincoln you just got, and went with the 140 to avoid running 220v. A month later I bought a plasma cutter and had to run the 220v line anyway, LOL. I wish I had gone for the 180 now. 

The 140 is a nice machine, but I can only do 3/16" in a single pass. For 1/4" they recommend multiple passes. Do yourself a favor, get a tank of argon (or argon/Co2 mix), I hate flux core. I think you will be happy with the 180. I built my front end loader with the 140, and it worked hard this summer with no broken welds. :)

 

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yeah The more I read the better I feel about the extra cash that I spent on the Lincoln. I was considering the Gas but I will try my hand at the FC for now. I will be running my 240v 40amp tomorrow some time. The Welder comes tomorrow as well. Looking forward to getting my swept front axle plow extension made and then slapping that forward swept front end on the 312-8. Got a new set of 16" x 7.5"-8" 4ply tires in on Friday too. 

YEAH BUDDY! That's my goal is to build a FEL with this welder. Among other things. I'm sure I'll find a thousands things to do with it. Fire off some pics of your FEL! Always like seeing them!

Edited by Mastiffman
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Okay, Was able to avoid having to fully rerun new wire... Got the 240v plug installed and ready to go.. Just waiting on UPS now...

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20170123_161216_Burst01.jpg

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On 1/23/2017 at 1:02 AM, Mastiffman said:

yeah The more I read the better I feel about the extra cash that I spent on the Lincoln. I was considering the Gas but I will try my hand at the FC for now. I will be running my 240v 40amp tomorrow some time. The Welder comes tomorrow as well. Looking forward to getting my swept front axle plow extension made and then slapping that forward swept front end on the 312-8. Got a new set of 16" x 7.5"-8" 4ply tires in on Friday too. 

YEAH BUDDY! That's my goal is to build a FEL with this welder. Among other things. I'm sure I'll find a thousands things to do with it. Fire off some pics of your FEL! Always like seeing them!



 

 

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