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Mastiffman

Hitch Weight Rack...

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On Saturday, December 17, 2016 at 8:50 AM, Mastiffman said:

My Hitch Came in the middle of the night so I will be using fortunately be using that today! BUT I will still like to find out about the max tongue wight for the stock hitch if anyone knows. I'll look for it in my free time as well. Later. 

EDIT: Photos.... :)

20161217_090527.jpg20161217_121402.jpg20161217_121353_HDR.jpg  

 

This was right after this mornings workout...

20161217_121043.jpg

I am going to do EXACTLY that.  you and Kurt have it perfect. Imho anyway.

 

Glenn

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Thanks Glenn. I got the idea from Kurt. So credit him. ;) 

 I could stack another 50lbs (2 weights) on this rod too. Maybe three if I reset the nuts on the bottom and four more weights if I use only 2 nuts to hold it together.

 

 I also put a 25Lbs weight wrapped in a towel in the front of the hood, vertically.

Edited by Mastiffman
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Good to see you got a nice set up.  I think about 100-125 lbs is about right.  I had mine out the other day and it worked perfectly.

 

Kurt

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I think that if I had another 50lbs back there (150lbs total) that may be just right. But it worked MUCH better than without it like last week. I was spinning the agro tires all over the place last week. Horrible traction!?
This week I had pretty good traction, even without chains. Which I don't plan on using with the Agro's. I don't plan on having to deal with any ice at this point and the agro's seem to grip well into any packed snow I went over.

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3 hours ago, Mastiffman said:

Thanks Glenn. I got the idea from Kurt. So credit him. ;) 

 I could stack another 50lbs (2 weights) on this rod too. Maybe three if I reset the nuts on the bottom and four more weights if I use only 2 nuts to hold it together.

 

 I also put a 25Lbs weight wrapped in a towel in the front of the hood, vertically.

I know you did. Kurt sent me some pics a few weeks ago, I really liked his setup, simple, innovative, easy.  Just throwing you a compliment to. I will do the same on my 5xi. 

 

Glenn

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1 hour ago, clueless said:

I've found that a few years of less physical work and more beer, you can add 30 to 50 pounds more weight directly over the rear axle.:handgestures-thumbupright:

                                                                                                   :text-yeahthat::text-goodpost:

 

Perfect.....We finally have the correct answer to one of the longest running :wh: debates, "how to best add weight to increase traction". 

   Zero cost,  no welding, no assembly, no tools, no pumps,    and can be instantly  transferred to any tractor.  :text-bravo:

Edited by Ed Kennell
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If it makes you guys feel any better, I have Tom's Ruprecht's hitches on my 5xi and my 416H.  I install a Heavy Hitch into either one and hang six JD suitcase weights on it at 40 lbs each.  Combined weight of the Heavy Hitch and the suitcase weight is about 260 pounds.  Not been a problem.  And by the way, I went thru the whole analysis of weight off the back v. wheel weights etc and I can tell you that the radial load on the needle bearings in the transaxle with weights on the back is far less than the allowable load spec'd on the bearing.  If you do a search you should find the post.  Like John Matthews (Shallowwatersailor), I use both rear and wheel mounted weights.

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37 minutes ago, Ed Kennell said:

                                                                                                   :text-yeahthat::text-goodpost:

 

Perfect.....We finally have the correct answer to one of the longest running :wh: debates, "how to best add weight to increase traction". 

   Zero cost,  no welding, no assembly, no tools, no pumps,    and can be instantly be transferred to any tractor.  :text-bravo:

The best thing, you don't have to look for it when you need it, it's right in front of you.

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1 hour ago, doc724 said:

If it makes you guys feel any better, I have Tom's Ruprecht's hitches on my 5xi and my 416H.  I install a Heavy Hitch into either one and hang six JD suitcase weights on it at 40 lbs each.  Combined weight of the Heavy Hitch and the suitcase weight is about 260 pounds.  Not been a problem.  And by the way, I went thru the whole analysis of weight off the back v. wheel weights etc and I can tell you that the radial load on the needle bearings in the transaxle with weights on the back is far less than the allowable load spec'd on the bearing.  If you do a search you should find the post.  Like John Matthews (Shallowwatersailor), I use both rear and wheel mounted weights.



 Okay, so this is what I did. I found the axle needle bearing Toro part number for my 520h (model 41-02OE01). The # is 9416. This is a 1 1/8" ID and 13/8" OD needle bearing. I believe I found the same bearing at Bearingsdirect.com and it's part number is J-1816 (Model # BA-1816Z).
HERE:
https://bearingsdirect.com/shell-cup-needle-rollers-inch-sizes/1945-j-1816-needle-roller-bearing-1-1-8-x-1-3-8-x1.html
 
I'm going to contact a few companies and see what they are saying for numbers. Unless you have a link or anything like that. Either way that would be appreciated.  
  

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Top of the transmission forum is a pinned post with all the bearing numbers WH and trade numbers

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Okay, so you guys might get some well needed relief out of the info that I have received today and going to share with now...

So I called a local large scale bearing distributor near me called Applied Technologies and spoke with a gentleman named Bruce... After cross referencing numbers and finding the right bearing that many of use are using in the transaxles for our tractors here is the data that he called back with. The information was found in a Timken Spec Catalog that was about 10 years old, even though Timken is now Koyo which I believe that he said is the producer of the bearings. 

Toro 9416 (model# J-1816) 1 1/8" ID/ 1 3/8" OD Needle Bearing:

 

Max Weight Limit:

Dynamic = 5,880lbs

Static = 10,800lbs

 

Max Rpm's:
Greased = 7,400 rpm's

Oiled = 11,000 rpm's

 

So as you can see, it seems that based off of the specs given, we will all be under the limitations of weight used. I'm guessing that the axle case would be destroyed long before the bearing if it boiled down to just a weight issue and not because the tractor wasn't maintained properly...

Edited by Mastiffman
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On 11/18/2016 at 10:26 PM, lynnmor said:

I now have a cracked left transaxle case.

:twocents-02cents:  Are you sure that there wasn't contact with an immovable object while in motion at some time that contributed to it?

In have a home made 2" hitch receiver on my 1055 snow plow :wh: and have a 16'; X 32" rack that slides into it, double duty, caries garden tools etc. in warm weather and four concrete blocks for weight for snow plowing traction,

2 hitch weight box 003.JPG

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16 minutes ago, 953 nut said:

:twocents-02cents:  Are you sure that there wasn't contact with an immovable object while in motion at some time that contributed to it?

In have a home made 2" hitch receiver on my 1055 snow plow :wh: and have a 16'; X 32" rack that slides into it, double duty, caries garden tools etc. in warm weather and four concrete blocks for weight for snow plowing traction,

 

 

Wow, I like that idea!  I've used a carry-all on my larger tractors for years and love it.  You gave me nice idea to add one to my 520H.  Thanks

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Yeah, a standard 8x8x16 cinder block weighs about 30-35lbs unless it's lighter kind which are about 28lbs... So that's some good weight. For extra you could place them on wood and fill the centers of the cells and make them even heavier!

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2 hours ago, Mastiffman said:

Okay, so you guys might get some well needed relief out of the info that I have received today and going to share with now...

So I called a local large scale bearing distributor near me called Applied Technologies and spoke with a gentleman named Bruce... After cross referencing numbers and finding the right bearing that many of use are using in the transaxles for our tractors here is the data that he called back with. The information was found in a Timken Spec Catalog that was about 10 years old, even though Timken is now Koyo which I believe that he said is the producer of the bearings. 

Toro 9416 (model# J-1816) 1 1/8" ID/ 1 3/8" OD Needle Bearing:

 

Max Weight Limit:

Dynamic = 5,880lbs

Static = 10,800lbs

 

Max Rpm's:
Greased = 7,400 rpm's

Oiled = 11,000 rpm's

 

So as you can see, it seems that based off of the specs given, we will all be under the limitations of weight used. I'm guessing that the axle case would be destroyed long before the bearing if it boiled down to just a weight issue and not because the tractor wasn't maintained properly...

1 1/8. Axles. An handle a LOT of weight! Look at smaller pickups like s10's rangers etc.  There axles are about the same size and are surface hardened like the wheel horse axles bearings are larger but the shafts are about the same size. Biggest difference are the tires are more protected on a pickup then on a tractor. When both times I broke a rear axle on a horse it was because I backed into a tree and a brick wall. On a vehical this never happens because the box or fenders are in the way. That kind of impact has the entire weight of the tractor pushing on one axle. It may not brake of at that point, but could cause it to crack and then fail with another smaller impact. Both of mine had this and rust was present were they broke off. 

 

Now think about this, add lots off weight to the rims to make the tire heavier. Say 100# per wheel. Now plow some snow and hit a hidden post or chunk of concrete and it stops you instantly. That weight is now putting a lot of force on that axle in a way it was not designed to. 

 

Loaders want around 300# of counter weight on the back end of the tractor, that's what I run on a axle that has over 1150 hours on it. No problems yet and no leaks yet. 

 

You add weight for traction, the more weight the more traction you get. If you add it to the wheels or to that back end, just be aware you are adding more stress to the axles and the morecarfull you need to be. Most axles will handle it no problem. Just be aware and you shold never have a issue. Most axle failures have two sides to the story. 

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Looks like mirrors might be a good addition to your tractor? lol- Just kidding of course. Good wisdom from experiences it seems. Thank you!

 

With any machinery, Be Careful for sure!

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3 hours ago, Mastiffman said:

Okay, so you guys might get some well needed relief out of the info that I have received today and going to share with now...

So I called a local large scale bearing distributor near me called Applied Technologies and spoke with a gentleman named Bruce... After cross referencing numbers and finding the right bearing that many of use are using in the transaxles for our tractors here is the data that he called back with. The information was found in a Timken Spec Catalog that was about 10 years old, even though Timken is now Koyo which I believe that he said is the producer of the bearings. 

Toro 9416 (model# J-1816) 1 1/8" ID/ 1 3/8" OD Needle Bearing:

 

Max Weight Limit:

Dynamic = 5,880lbs

Static = 10,800lbs

 

Max Rpm's:
Greased = 7,400 rpm's

Oiled = 11,000 rpm's

 

So as you can see, it seems that based off of the specs given, we will all be under the limitations of weight used. I'm guessing that the axle case would be destroyed long before the bearing if it boiled down to just a weight issue and not because the tractor wasn't maintained properly...

 

Same conclusion I came to :-)

 

 

 

Don

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Yeah, like a lot of "ideas" about stuff on the internet, fact checking has always helped me to come to better conclusion... Really Loving the specs above though! B) Lots of reassurance.

Take care of your machine and it will take care of you!

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1 hour ago, smoreau said:

Now plow some snow and hit a hidden post or chunk of concrete and it stops you instantly.

Strike an immovable object and with or without added weight the sudden jolt will harm the transaxle or the frame.

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3 hours ago, 953 nut said:

:twocents-02cents:  Are you sure that there wasn't contact with an immovable object while in motion at some time that contributed to it?

 

Nope, didn't hit anything.  Just think of the foot pounds of torque with cinder blocks hanging way back there.

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