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tractorhogg

Old air compressor

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Common sense rules. Use the wire gauge to support the load's current draw, then you size the breaker / fuse to support the wire gauge.

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On 3/18/2016 at 4:36 PM, tractorhogg said:

 I ran romex inside the conduit 

 

Around here that's against code. :(

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The sheathing on the romex is considered as conduit. You can't put conduit inside of conduit. The wire can overheat in that situation.

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39 minutes ago, squonk said:

The sheathing on the romex is considered as conduit. You can't put conduit inside of conduit. The wire can overheat in that situation.

Using that reasoning wouldn't the insulation around the wires also be considered conduit? Or still wouldn't that conduit over heat inside walls or under insulation as well. It would seem to me that if the wire overheats, trouble will happen, inside or outside of conduit. I thinks some of these codes are bit over the top, but I understand they are designed to protect us from harm, but that is exactly what will doom the human race, lack of natural selection.

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On 3/20/2016 at 11:45 PM, Save Old Iron said:

Common sense rules. Use the wire gauge to support the load's current draw, then you size the breaker / fuse to support the wire gauge.

one other consideration,

 

if you are wiring several 20 amp legs into your shop, remember to "load balance" the two circuits of the 220 feed. Don't put all your heavy draw 120 circuits onto only one side of the 220 buss in the breaker box.

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7 hours ago, Save Old Iron said:

one other consideration,

 

if you are wiring several 20 amp legs into your shop, remember to "load balance" the two circuits of the 220 feed. Don't put all your heavy draw 120 circuits onto only one side of the 220 buss in the breaker box.

yep, thats why I used the existing welder plug in, it was balanced in the panel, thanks. I have to unplug the compressor right now to use the stick welder, but I;m okay with that.

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Aside from  the interesting electrical jargon older compressors like that are like our older tractors ...built with our grandad's steel...

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The wire and insulation combined has  a temperature rating. It is rated as being covered by only by one covering being romex, plastic, or metal conduit. Putting a wire in in 2 conduits decreases the wire temp rating. I know what you mean about the codes being extreme. Just like it's against code to twist wires together and then use a wire nut over the twisted wire. If you use a wire nut the wires have to be laying next to each other. At least that was the code here about 12 years ago.

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6 minutes ago, squonk said:

The wire and insulation combined has  a temperature rating. It is rated as being covered by only by one covering being romex, plastic, or metal conduit. Putting a wire in in 2 conduits decreases the wire temp rating. I know what you mean about the codes being extreme. Just like it's against code to twist wires together and then use a wire nut over the twisted wire. If you use a wire nut the wires have to be laying next to each other. At least that was the code here about 12 years ago.

I know most of this code is for safety, but after awhile it just seems like a bunch of OCD guys got together to write codes

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On 3/20/2016 at 9:42 AM, squonk said:

Around here that's against code. :(

In 2009 I started the 3.5 year project of doing a full renovation of the house my kids in across the street. The back of the house has a room in basement that has concrete floor, walls and ceiling. The room on first floor (kitchen) has floor, ceiling and walls. To meet code and bring power through room in basement to feed up into kitchen I was required to run the romex though conduit. This was due to the inability to run it through the concrete joists (only way to describe them) like you do when running them through the floor or ceiling joists.

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Here you would run THHN individual wires, Black White and Green through the conduit for 120V. Add a red for 240. Way easier than trying to push romex sheathed cable through. 

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