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tractorhogg

Old air compressor

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I bought this old air compressor from an auction site in Kansas. In the picture supplied I assumed the compressor was a small compressor, when I went to pick it up, without the trailer I was pleased and surprised. We (four guys and a crane) got it into the back of my van, barely, its sits 51 inches tall on skids. The previous owner was the City of Augusta, Kansas and they bought it new in the mid 60s. It was wired by two hot leads and the flex conduit served as  ground. I didn't want to hook it up that way due to a previous bad experience with being electrocuted by a compressor on rubber tires plugged into 240 with a hot lead that broke off and electrified the entire machine. I ran romex inside the conduit and attached the ground inside the pressure box to a screw that attached to the compressor plate and used a standard 3 prong welder plug. Sure is much quieter than my old harbor freight chip and bang compressor and puts out a lot of air. Best 150.00 I ever spent.

 

Edited by tractorhogg
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Looks like a good industrial unit.  It's not a good idea using flex conduit as the ground. You made a good call by starting fresh.  You didn't need my help anyway, right.  :thumbs:

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3 minutes ago, Retired Sparky said:

Looks like a good industrial unit.  It's not a good idea using flex conduit as the ground. You made a good call by starting fresh.  You didn't need my help anyway, right.  :thumbs:

I knew the conduit would not ground the compressor and if a hot lead came off and contacted the compressor, it being on wood skids and not grounded, it would shock the bejeezes out of a person. I also new all I need to do was hook a ground to the compressor itself to solve the issue, but what I had to make sure my grounds were tied into my neutral wires inside my (1967) panel box as this might cause problems as well. I'm not an electrician, but I have survived over a dozen pretty serious electrocutions, so I guess I didn't need to say the first part. Fingers do work as a current tester, but I don't recommend it.

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2 minutes ago, tractorhogg said:

I knew the conduit would not ground the compressor and if a hot lead came off and contacted the compressor, it being on wood skids and not grounded, it would shock the bejeezes out of a person. I also new all I need to do was hook a ground to the compressor itself to solve the issue, but what I had to make sure my grounds were tied into my neutral wires inside my (1967) panel box as this might cause problems as well. I'm not an electrician, but I have survived over a dozen pretty serious electrocutions, so I guess I didn't need to say the first part. Fingers do work as a current tester, but I don't recommend it.

There is bond and there is ground in the NEC.   That's what the green wire is for, your safety.  That's why so many houses burnt down years ago using BX wire. You'd get a short and the BX would heat up like the filaments in your toaster. That will make a fire, no problem.  Good call. :thumbs:

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BTW, Its wired to a 40 amp 240 volt service. It shuts off at 175 PSI and kicks on at 145 PSI

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43 minutes ago, tractorhogg said:

BTW, Its wired to a 40 amp 240 volt service. It shuts off at 175 PSI and kicks on at 145 PSI

What's the HP rating on the motor.

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1 minute ago, Retired Sparky said:

What's the HP rating on the motor.

1-1/2 at 1500 rpm or 1800 rpm

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Just now, tractorhogg said:

1-1/2 at 1500 rpm or 1800 rpm

I don't have the NEC  in front of me. You might me a little high on your fuses.   Take care and be safe.

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19 minutes ago, Retired Sparky said:

I don't have the NEC  in front of me. You might me a little high on your fuses.   Take care and be safe.

Its actually a double 20amp or 20amp on each leg if that matters

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Good looking compressor. I'm a big fan of old belt driven compressors.

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17 hours ago, tractorhogg said:

bad experience with being electrocuted by a compressor on rubber tires plugged into 240 with a hot lead that broke of

If you are writing this thread, you were not electrocuted!:ychain:

 

Good buy on the compressor!!

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16 hours ago, Retired Sparky said:

I don't have the NEC  in front of me. You might me a little high on your fuses.   Take care and be safe.

Its actually a double 20amp or 20amp on each leg if that matters

If you are writing this thread, you were not electrocuted

You might be right, but if you were there you may not believe there is much of a difference between being shocked and electrocuted. I actually grabbed the compressor three times, it didn't get any less hot, but I had to know. The last time was a doozy

 

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You should be fine tractorhog. That's a 2 pole 20 amp. It doesn't add up to 40 amps. Nice find. :)

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54 minutes ago, Racinbob said:

You should be fine tractorhog. That's a 2 pole 20 amp. It doesn't add up to 40 amps. Nice find. :)

I know, right. I can't teach you guys about engines.  But at least I have my own trade to fall back on. 

 Maybe I can prevent a structure fire. B)

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I actually have two extra 15 amp breakers and have a place in the barn panel i'd like to use one of the 20 amp breakers. I could save money ()and maybe my hide) by flying you out here. I'm just afraid of the disappointing looks and glares. I paid a firm to remove three oil/gas pump jacks off  the property that had 240 underground electric several hundrd yard to each well, they epoxied the ends of the wire and left them connected to a panel on the pole. I hit three wires that were under my garden with the tiller on the back of my tractor and found they still had power to them, call me surprised and sparky. I still have wire underground and some issues with it tying into other service panels in the barn and well house. It seems the guy that built the house tied everything into everything. I'm sure it was right in 1965 -1966, but every time I call an electrician out here they look at it and leave. I told the wife that she may have to sweet talk them next time and I wouldn't be against a little side action, if we could get it straightened out, wow, I didn't get dinner for a week, sheesh.

Edited by tractorhogg
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18 minutes ago, tractorhogg said:

I actually have two extra 15 amp breakersand have a place in the barn panel i'd like to use one of the 20 amp breakers

I'm sorry pal, you and I don't speak the same language.  It sounds like you want to use a 15amp breaker and a 20 amp breaker to feed your compressor.  On a 220 volt circuit, you need a 2 pole 15 amp breaker to feed your compressor.  Please do not mix breaker sizes. If you don't understand everything about you are doing, please get some local licensed help.  I'm only looking out for your safety.:unsure:

Edited by Retired Sparky
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12 minutes ago, Retired Sparky said:

I'm sorry pal, you and I don't speak the same language.  It sounds like you want to use a 15amp breaker and a 20 amp breaker to feed your compressor.  On a 220 volt circuit, you need a 2 pole 15 amp breaker to feed your compressor.  Please do not mix breaker sizes. If you don't understand everything about you are doing, please get some local licensed help.  I'm only looking out for your safety.:unsure:

I just don't know the correct terminology, we're on the same page. I REALLY appreciate  you taking the time to keep me straight!

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2 minutes ago, tractorhogg said:

I just don't know the correct terminology, we're on the same page. I REALLY appreciate  you taking the time to keep me straight!

Thank you for telling me that. That' s all it is, terminology.  You guys have so much knowledge as far as the tractors we all love.  I've owned mine for 30 yrs. So I have to learn what to do the hard way.  But in the mean time I've spent a good heal of my life, away from home trying to put bread on the table. Being an electrician is at the heart of my life.  When you say some things that don't jibe with knowledge it just make me cringe. I'm thinking, oh please don't do that.  But it's OK. We're on the same page. Big breathe. 

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Ya got me wondering now tractor. Do you have two 20 amp breakers or one two pole 20? If you have two individual 20's you need to install a breaker tie so if one leg trips it pulls the other leg off as well. Better yet, buy a two pole and then you'll have two single pole 20's to use. Breakers in that amp range are not expensive. Don't take a chance for a few bucks savings.

 

It doesn't make sence that a qualified electrician would refuse to help you out. It CAN be fixed. You just may not like the bill. :)

Also, a 15 amp circuit will be fine as sparky said but your 20 is fine as long as you used #12 wire.

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2 minutes ago, Racinbob said:

Ya got me wondering now tractor. Do you have two 20 amp breakers or one two pole 20? If you have two individual 20's you need to install a breaker tie so if one leg trips it pulls the other leg off as well. Better yet, buy a two pole and then you'll have two single pole 20's to use. Breakers in that amp range are not expensive. Don't take a chance for a few bucks savings.

 

It doesn't make sence that a qualified electrician would refuse to help you out. It CAN be fixed. You just may not like the bill. :)

Its Oklahoma. No codes out in my area, none, most electricians around here aren't even licensed, no union, no rules, no brains, but most can get you some dope or some fighting chickens, one two pole 20.

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You are covered by NFPA 70 like everybody else in the nation. It's the minimum. Local codes must meet them but can exceed them. BUT, as here in Florida, it doesn't mean they play by the rules. My electrical career was in Indiana. Big difference. I assure you, there are qualified contractors in Oklahoma. You just need to find one. I'd suggest contacting the local IBEW hall. They will help you out. :)

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1 hour ago, Retired Sparky said:

Thank you for telling me that. That' s all it is, terminology.  You guys have so much knowledge as far as the tractors we all love.  I've owned mine for 30 yrs. So I have to learn what to do the hard way.  But in the mean time I've spent a good heal of my life, away from home trying to put bread on the table. Being an electrician is at the heart of my life.  When you say some things that don't jibe with knowledge it just make me cringe. I'm thinking, oh please don't do that.  But it's OK. We're on the same page. Big breathe. 

I ALWAYS ask, ask again, and ask a third time before I do anything. I feel the same way when people use spray cans to paint, it's not a complete waste of time AND money, but almost. It does save a tractor for a time. Since many women do painting in the home, the value of a painter  goes down as women are paid less and the jobs they do pay less. If the wife does the painting in the house, you sure won't hire a guy for 30 and hour or God forbid a contractor, but since the wives rarely do heat and air, plumbling, or electrical, those jobs pay more. Many don't have the equipment, skill, or time to do anyway, but spray can, and since "anyone" can paint (versus do electrical work) painting is cheap most places. Here in Oklahoma, its tough for a journeyman electrician to make much more than 20 hr, same with RNs, journeyman painters make closer to 12 and hour. I'm almost 60 and other than 6 years in the Army back in the 70's I have never worked for anyone or taken a check from anyone, being able to live life on those terms takes a different skill set as new money must be made every week.

I live out in the country, I can call all I want they rarely come out. I have had no luck in getting a plumber, electrician, or heat and air guy out this way. I had to install most of my in house plumbing replace septic line from house to tank, from tank to lateral field, all with a shovel, I installed every sink and toilet, put in new mixing valves in a shower, installed a Jenn-Air grill with the vent in the bottom and ran a duct up inside the wall and out, roofed the house and well house, and done countless electrical repairs. I don't know if its because I'm out here on the prairie or that no one around here wants to work. I do know that 25 percent of the people that live in this state are on parole, probation, or incarcerated, that doesn't leave a large work force.

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1 hour ago, Racinbob said:

Ya got me wondering now tractor. Do you have two 20 amp breakers or one two pole 20? If you have two individual 20's you need to install a breaker tie so if one leg trips it pulls the other leg off as well. Better yet, buy a two pole and then you'll have two single pole 20's to use. Breakers in that amp range are not expensive. Don't take a chance for a few bucks savings.

 

It doesn't make sence that a qualified electrician would refuse to help you out. It CAN be fixed. You just may not like the bill. :)

Also, a 15 amp circuit will be fine as sparky said but your 20 is fine as long as you used #12 wire.

     Yes, I agree.  #12 wire is good, especially if there is a size able distance between the panel and the compressor.  I think we are all together on that. B)

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I used #12 wire, the panel is less than 4 feet from the box, but I used 8 feet of wire and flex conduit in order to be able to move the compressor in case I wanted to change its placement or work on it.

Edited by tractorhogg
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9 minutes ago, tractorhogg said:

I used #12 wire, the panel is less than 4 feet from the box, but I used 8 feet of wire and flex conduit in order to be able to move the compressor in case I wanted to change its placement or work on it.

   Sounds good. talk to ya later.

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