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WNYPCRepair

Tool Time!

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I got a new toy today, so I thought I would share, then I thought maybe others would too, so I picked the title in case anyone else feels like sharing their toys. I know I would love to see some tool porn. :) 

Anyway, I found that the plasma cutter works on angle iron and square tubing, but it isn't perfect. Slag at the corners can build up, though that may be my air supply, I still haven't gotten a dryer. Any way, I picked up a band saw, which works, but it isn't easy to keep it straight, and it is heavy. I kept seeing ads for steel blades for mitre saws, and started reading up on it. Turns out, if you slow the mitre saw down you can use these carbide tipped blades to cut steel. No sparks to speak of, no dust, and a nice quick clean cut. So, I decided to try it. 


box.thumb.JPG.153de380371aca7bdd8247f180

 

 

 

Assembled, ready to test


assembled.thumb.JPG.5d165d5c7c9fe8a0084e



In action:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The finished cut. In the video, it didn't cut all the way through, though it was only a 32nd or so it easily bent off. I cut again and pressed down hard on the handle at the end, and it just barely cut it all the way, left a hair like piece. It needs a very tiny adjustment. The picture below is from the second cut, after pressing down hard.

 



cut.thumb.JPG.eac53e0109d192d6dea631d7a0



So far, I am very impressed, although I am convinced one of the carbide teeth is going to fly off and go through my shield and glasses and put out my eye. :)

 

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I bought a carbide metal cutting blade several years back had haven't even tried it yet!  Made for a regular 7 1/4 circ saw.  I've read good reviews but just haven't had to have it yet.  Wondering how long it will stay sharp?

 

Flying teeth are for other parts, BBs for the eyes!  :rolleyes:

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They do dull, but can be resharpened by any saw sharpening service, and even without resharpening, they are supposed to save over abrasive cutoff wheels. But they have to be used in the saw built for it. The speed of the blade is the key, the saw I bought is 2500 RPM, my normal mitre saw is 5400 RPM. Their website says the blade will last as long as 20 abrasive blades.

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One of my favorite tools is the ordenairy nut lathe or adjustable wrenge as it's more commonly known

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A former customer of mine runs a body shop/ auto sales place. He would buy wrecks and rebuild them. If he had a Ford Exploder smashed in the front he'd find another Exploder hit in the rear. Then take a skill saw with the cut off wheel and cut them in half and join the good parts. :lol:

Edited by squonk
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Years back I was using an abrasive wheels on a radial arm saw, the blade guard was plastic and the sparks from several cuts started to melt it, couple more cuts and it probably would have caught fire.

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4 hours ago, WNYPCRepair said:

Turns out, if you slow the mitre saw down you can use these carbide tipped blades to cut steel

When you say "slow it down", are you referring to the actual saw (RPM's) speed of the blade or the "feed" (arm pushing down speed)?

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45 minutes ago, KC9KAS said:

When you say "slow it down", are you referring to the actual saw (RPM's) speed of the blade or the "feed" (arm pushing down speed)?

 

 

The saw runs at much lower RPMs, 2500 vs 5400 for a regular wood mitre saw

 

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I personally would get a metal saw,then put the special blade on that,i have a cheap metal chop saw and it works pretty good for my needs

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15 minutes ago, can whlvr said:

I personally would get a metal saw,then put the special blade on that,i have a cheap metal chop saw and it works pretty good for my needs

 

 

I got the metal saw and the blade. The blade will be ruined if you put it in a regular saw. I saw reviews where someone put one in a 5400 RPM mitre saw and almost all the teeth came off. 

 

 

This is supposed to be cheaper in the long run than a chop saw, and no sparks or metal dust. 

Edited by WNYPCRepair

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I like the speed of that saw and it's perfect for small materials.

 

One of the best tools I ever bought for metal working is a horizontal band saw. Quick set up time and accurate. Although it's not quite as fast of a cut, you can do other things while it's cutting. Found one of these on CL for less than 1/2 price of new

 

 

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Edited by wallfish
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If I had a shop, I would definitely consider one, I just don't have room. I have to store the mitre saw away between uses now, I need more space

 

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Funny, I was looking at tools on CL. $650

 

 

56ae34dd9c867_bandsaw.jpg.688504524bb924
 

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On January 29, 2016 at 1:58 PM, WNYPCRepair said:

I got a new toy today, so I thought I would share, then I thought maybe others would too, so I picked the title in case anyone else feels like sharing their toys. I know I would love to see some tool porn. :) 

Anyway, I found that the plasma cutter works on angle iron and square tubing, but it isn't perfect. Slag at the corners can build up, though that may be my air supply, I still haven't gotten a dryer. Any way, I picked up a band saw, which works, but it isn't easy to keep it straight, and it is heavy. I kept seeing ads for steel blades for mitre saws, and started reading up on it. Turns out, if you slow the mitre saw down you can use these carbide tipped blades to cut steel. No sparks to speak of, no dust, and a nice quick clean cut. So, I decided to try it. 


 

 

 

 

Assembled, ready to test


assembled.thumb.JPG.5d165d5c7c9fe8a0084e








So far, I am very impressed, although I am convinced one of the carbide teeth is going to fly off and go through my shield and glasses and put out my eye. :)

 

 

 

I used this today to cut the 2" square tubing for my front end loader, and some 1/4" plate for gussets, worked like a charm

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I would be very careful with that idea. I have been a woodworker all my life and use those saws on a daily basis. I have used them to cut non-ferrous metals only with a carbide tipped blade with a negative hook teeth and never with no less than 80 teeth using the appropriate lubricant. Even with all the correct procedures it is dangerous at best. I have pieces of aluminum and bronze in-bedded on the wall behind it as a testimony to how quickly things can go bad. Even if it will cut steel as demonstrated that blade will dull quickly and it will grab material being cut. Definitely do not try to cut  and use left hand to hold material being cut. CLAMP IT. The odds are not in your favor, I would not use it for that purpose.

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15 minutes ago, formariz said:

I would be very careful with that idea. I have been a woodworker all my life and use those saws on a daily basis. I have used them to cut non-ferrous metals only with a carbide tipped blade with a negative hook teeth and never with no less than 80 teeth using the appropriate lubricant. Even with all the correct procedures it is dangerous at best. I have pieces of aluminum and bronze in-bedded on the wall behind it as a testimony to how quickly things can go bad. Even if it will cut steel as demonstrated that blade will dull quickly and it will grab material being cut. Definitely do not try to cut  and use left hand to hold material being cut. CLAMP IT. The odds are not in your favor, I would not use it for that purpose.

 

 

This is not a wood cutting mitre saw, it is designed to cut steel up to 1/4" thick. It turns at about half the speed of a wood cutting mitre saw. So far it has performed perfectly. Used it again today to cut 4" x 1/4 stock for the pedestal mounts on my FEL. And yes, I do use the clamp.

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1 minute ago, WNYPCRepair said:

 

 

This is not a wood cutting mitre saw, it is designed to cut steel up to 1/4" thick. It turns at about half the speed of a wood cutting mitre saw. So far it has performed perfectly. Used it again today to cut 4" x 1/4 stock for the pedestal mounts on my FEL. And yes, I do use the clamp.

 

Yes I understand that it designed for that function, namely that it turns slower. However the dynamics of it and the physics of a toothed dull blade  are the same as on a woodworking saw. BE CAREFUL.

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18 minutes ago, formariz said:

 

Yes I understand that it designed for that function, namely that it turns slower. However the dynamics of it and the physics of a toothed dull blade  are the same as on a woodworking saw. BE CAREFUL.

 

 

Gotcha. I am still kind of convinced the teeth are going to fly off. I wear safety glasses, a face shield, a leather welding apron and welding gloves. Hopefully, I'll survive if anything happens. If not, give my wife a fair price for all my horses and stuff. :)

 

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i made one of these myself - borrowed the idea from their pictures , use the thing constantly making parts/stuff here in my shop .

http://www.swagoffroad.com/SWAG-Portaband-Tables-Accessories_c_35.html

 

Between that , my home built press brake , lathe and the welders , I'm set ...except maybe a mill..

12 ton small.jpg

 

Sarge

 

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