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stevasaurus

SO, YOU WANT TO SAVE THAT WH 3 PIECE TRANNY

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Took the casting in post #148 and wire brushed...used brake cleaner and primed and painted today..  Might get to put it together this weekend.  :)

 

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Notice the black from the E-Tank.   Wire wheeled and wiped with bake cleaner...then primed and sprayed with Rust-Oleum Regal Red.  It will set until the weekend in the basement to cure.  :)

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Steve I'm anxiously watching this thread since I also have a tranny to rebuild.  However may I share a painful lesson. Brake cleaner is a great solvent for final wipe down before paint or gaskets. However it soaks into the metal pores like the cast steel case. Then the chemical in it can act as a "release agent" for  silicone  or RTV gasket sealers if you don,t give it enough time to fully evaporate out of the metal pores.  We made this mistake at work on a large hydro generator overhaul in the mid-90,s and almost every gasket leaked. After a lot of head scratching and finger pointing the Locktite Engr figured out out problem. 

SO.....the moral of the story is if you wipe gasketed surfaces down with brake cleaner (or other strong solvents). Give them an hour to breathe before putting gasket sealer on them  

 

Edited by oliver2-44
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I  picked up   my RJ  frame from my welder yesterday.    I  had taken the frame to the welder as it was missing the left  side of the hoodstand welded to the frame.   This is the side that the left handle latch with the knotch on it sets in place  when the rear hitch is lifted up.     This was cut off on the frame I  had purchased -so I needed some  additions.      The little knotch piece rides about 6 1/2 inches  from the bottom of the frame and is about 4 inches long.  It is placed at about a 30 degree angle from the frame.   

 

Picture  # 3 shows the new  left side with the kotch  welded on  before I primed it. 

 

 

 

Photo # 4  is the front part of the frame that  some previous work was done on with  some welding done to the frame.  Looks like  steer bars were added on the sides with heavy weld beads .    I  used a 4 inch angle grinder to drind that all down before  painting with grey primer.

 

Photo # 6  is what the  left side  hoodstand piece with lift handle knotch looks like on a restored RJ.

 

 

I also completed the painting of the RJ  18 hole seat pan seen in photo #  6.

 

 

 

 

 

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The final  photo shows the  "before"  picture of the hood and frame with the left side of the hoodstand cutoff.

 

 

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This final picture I added in an edit shows that the weld bead from the fourth photo (above)  has mostly been removed with the angle grinder.

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Lane Ranger
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Oliver...thank you very much for that information...I did not know that.  :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

Lane that looks very nice Mate.  :)

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An update on the cracked, 2 piece, differential housing.  Engineguy63 (Eric) purchased this housing, thinking he knew some friends that could fix it so he could use it in his Suburban.

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His friends decided the best way to fix it, was to turn it true and press a collar on the end.  They did an excellent job, and even succeeded in closing the crack.  Here are the pictures.  :handgestures-thumbupright:  Thanks Eric

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I would count this as #1 transmission saved.  :)

 

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Glad to see Eric was able to save that differential !  That collar idea is  just what the doctor  ordered !   Should go on working for many more years !

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On 2/8/2016 at 11:58 AM, stevasaurus said:

Like Jim said...it is Regal Red from Rust-Oleum.  I happen to like the Rust-Oleum and Regal Red is a very good match for the older Wheel Horses.  Krolyon, makes a good red also...I think it is Cherry something.  If any paint has an IH Red (International Harvester)...it is a good bet you could use that and it would be close.  :)

Regal Red is what I redid my with.  I gave the hood a light compounding and the color just pops in the sun.DSC04796.JPG.95675c14ceb784f3d8aa2c763e4

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On 2/24/2016 at 8:21 PM, oliver2-44 said:

Steve I'm anxiously watching this thread since I also have a tranny to rebuild.  However may I share a painful lesson. Brake cleaner is a great solvent for final wipe down before paint or gaskets. However it soaks into the metal pores like the cast steel case. Then the chemical in it can act as a "release agent" for  silicone  or RTV gasket sealers if you don,t give it enough time to fully evaporate out of the metal pores.  We made this mistake at work on a large hydro generator overhaul in the mid-90,s and almost every gasket leaked. After a lot of head scratching and finger pointing the Locktite Engr figured out out problem. 

SO.....the moral of the story is if you wipe gasketed surfaces down with brake cleaner (or other strong solvents). Give them an hour to breathe before putting gasket sealer on them  

 

Brake cleaners come in different formulas. There is chlorinated (flammable) and non-chlorinated (Non flammable) The non-cl evaporates much faster. It is also used as an electric motor cleaner. I use non CL all the time (since I almost burned up my B-I-L's Mark VII in my front yard!) :) It is also an excellent Bee killer! My dad was allergic to bees and I bought him a case of it every Christmas.978100981avatar.gif.ece256e00653fc4996ed

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As comprehensive as it gets Steve. 

Very nicely done brother.  :thanks:

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Nice work! I realized after I watched your video that I had actually watched other trans videos a few months ago that you have done.

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11 hours ago, squonk said:

Brake cleaners come in different formulas. There is chlorinated (flammable) and non-chlorinated (Non flammable) The non-cl evaporates much faster. It is also used as an electric motor cleaner. I use non CL all the time (since I almost burned up my B-I-L's Mark VII in my front yard!) :) It is also an excellent Bee killer! My dad was allergic to bees and I bought him a case of it every Christmas.978100981avatar.gif.ece256e00653fc4996ed

Excellent Mike and correct. I've used non-chlorinated for many years starting out on firearms then found it did such a good job I use it as a final cleaner for most anything. I didn't know about the bees though. I can certainly use that idea.

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11 minutes ago, Racinbob said:

Excellent Mike and correct. I've used non-chlorinated for many years starting out on firearms then found it did such a good job I use it as a final cleaner for most anything. I didn't know about the bees though. I can certainly use that idea.

Back in the days before V.O.C. laws, Castle brand brake cleaner would shoot about 20 feet out of the can straw. Great for those long range kill shots! :)

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nice tutorial steve,this will be a big help for guys doing their own,its scary the first time not knowing but this will take that unknown out:handgestures-thumbupright:

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Thanks for all those pics, Steve. Lots of good info in this thread for those of us that haven't had one of these apart yet. I'm following this so i can refer to it when I need to. 

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Steve:  The detailed explanations and photos for the RJ reassembly are very , very good !    You have highlighted the with great skill and cautions the issues you can face with each step-sequenced in the best manner!

 

I am overwhelmed at how much  great information you have to convey on these three piece transmissions!    

 

We all may have battery or solar power cars in 50 years but it sure looks to me like some  RJ and Suburban Wheel Horse tractors will still be around long after that!

 

:banana-dreads:

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Just so you guys know...I did have to open it back up.  It was the key I used for the large reduction gear on the cluster gear shaft.  It just did not feel right when I put it together.  Sure enough, the gear was up a touch and bound up the works once it was bolted together.  Everything should fit together easily...if you are forcing anything...pull it out and see why.  I had to force this gear over the key and I went with it.  Pulled it back apart...grabbed a different key and the gear slid right on.  Bolted it back up...after checking things and all is good.

   I had a feeling about that key yesterday, so I kind of knew where to look.  What I did to verify...unbolt a few turns the bolts on the side plate (brake shaft side) that are around the cluster gear shaft.  Everything loosened up and turned freely...I knew it was that key.  It does take a little playing around with to make sure things fit nice.  It only took about 1/2 hour to fix this, but it had me thinking about it all night.  When I give this horse an apple, I am going to take a bite out of it 1st.  :handgestures-thumbupright:

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My take apart was having the cluster gear upside down..... very easy to mistake to make! :hide:

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If it goes in easier than what Steve described it might in backwards!

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A little more progress on the RJ  rebuild.

 

My  rear hitch is all cleaned, primed and painted Rustoleum Regal Red.     A big thanks to Jake Kuhn  for selling  me this one !     I bought before I realized that one of the other 4 transmissions Steve has had a rear hitch on it !

 

 

Also thanks to  Craig  (AMC Rules) for posting the information about the NAPA throttle cable that they sell for $15.99  (Part No  703906)  that lines up perfectly for the holes on the RJ Hood used by the original throttle cable handle base.    Mine was very badly rusted and pitted so I did need to find a replacement.

 

The Kohler K 91 motor is almost ready to use.   I have a new Kohler cup and screen to go under a Kohler recoil  that I have for this 4 HP motor.  This motor was the original motor on another RJ  I bought two years ago.   I had it removed to repair a wire that had been chewed on by mice as they established a major housing complex under the tin of the Kohler while sitting in a barn.   If you have never had to removed one of those mice messes you just have not lived.

 

 

Sunday afternoon I started more work on the RJ  frame.    My  clutch pedal was rusted up on the 3/4 inch foot pedal rod.   Also some previous owner had installed three steel spacers that moved the clutch rod further out from the frames.  The pedal and spacers were all heavily rusted so I started applying PB Blaster  every half hour or so.    I did this for four hours.       Finally a couple hammer taps started to move the clutch pedal.       I then used my pry bar with a flat head surface to knock the clutch pedal off making sure to do so around  the closest points on the clutch  near the 3/4 inch round foot pedal bar.  Off came the clutch and I cleaned rust with  a Dremel  (sand paper head)   and then started work on removing the three spacers.      2 photos of the frame and foot pedal show rust after I removed with Dremel and wire brush.    I did buy three brass 3/4 inch washers ( I wanted stainless steel but the local hardware store only had 3/4 stainless washers that were  large like for auto application)  on the foot pedal to allow the lift handle to set away from the frame about a 1/4 inch but still be able to lock on the hoodstand lift tab.

 

 

Going to start focusing on the motor  work remaining and my wheels and front tires and  then my RJ hood redo for now.

 

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I also did get the underside of my RJ fenders painted with Regal Red today too!

 

 

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Edited by Lane Ranger
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nice work lane,i had bought a tractor 312-h and it seemed seized,got the tractor for real cheap,anyway it turns out the flywheel was full of nut shells and wouldn't turn over

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Don:     Yes it is a wonder how much crap they can stuff behind those tins that you can't even get your fingers in !   Nut shells can be a pain  especially walnut.  The squirrel's in my neighborhood  plant walnuts like a 

 

             first year forestry student !  I am always kicking them up mowing!

   

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On February 29, 2016 at 9:49 AM, WHX6 said:

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Wow, that looks brand new.

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Yes it did clean up nice Brian considering the goop that came out of it! I don't think the PO ever had it inside either, just a tarp over it with no shifter boot on it to keep water out. Amazing that just keeping some kind of oil in them can help preserve them. All I did was run them through the ultra sonic then regular parts cleaner. None of this e-tank bussiness for me......yet....

As soon as I am done cleaning all gears & bearings go into a tub with clean 80/90 in it so no flash rust. Prelubed for reassembly that way but messy.

Edited by WHX6
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