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Geno

Piercing leads for testing

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These are piercing leads for testing that I've used for many years.  Just thought if you guys didn't know about them I would put one on here.  You can hook it to a meter and go like crazy or put a test light into the banana plug end and do the same.  Makes life fast and easy and does no damage to the wire.  :)

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For spark-plug wires?

 

I would be afraid that with the high voltage going through a spark-plug wire there would be a spark from the piercing to ground.

Is that a problem?

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They are for testing for voltage and grounds. 

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Right on Geno. No shop is complete without a good set of these.

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Remember to use liquid tape to seal the hole when done. Moisture love open insulation

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The pierce is gone at most in a few hours, it's a very fine point.  :handgestures-thumbsup:

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The pierce is gone at most in a few hours, it's a very fine point.  :handgestures-thumbsup:

I know, but moisture will still find its way in. I have been doing electrical on autos for 40 years and I can always tell when a wire has been pierced.

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IT'S A PROBE...  :scared-eek:    It's a Probe..   :crying-yellow: ...  Their out there...Noooo ... :sci-fi-beamup:

Edited by chazm
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I know, but moisture will still find its way in. I have been doing electrical on autos for 40 years and I can always tell when a wire has been pierced.

:text-+1:

 

Do I have a set, yes.

 

Have I ever used them, NO. 

 

Why do I even own a set?

For that one in a thousand situation where a cam sensor or crank sensor is literally buried in a engine compartment and I'm already 99% sure its the sensor at fault. If I would pierce a wire, I would cut it at the pierce and splice it with an approved self healing silicone crimp similar to what is used in telephone repair work.

 

I would never use these devices on my personal vehicles for the reasons stated above. The manufacturer goes thru great effort to spec weather tite connectors and quality insulation for their harnesses. Dealers highly discourage poking holes in harnesses due to warranty concerns.

 

Is this a concern for the do it yourselfer? Doubt it. Then again I can't imagine these devices being necessary in the repair of lawn and garden equipment.

 

Poking holes in harness wires is certainly not considered a "best practice" in professional circles.

Edited by Save Old Iron
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Right. Poke if you must but after the problem is solved repair/ replace wire. Even if the hole seals itself the tensile strength is compromised

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You have no choice but to use something like this if you have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it. 

 

You have 4 choices,

 

#1 - use piercing leads

#2 - get out the knife and skin it back all over the place like most do

#3 - pull the harness apart and start looking then have to put it all back as it was

#4 - run a new wire

 

In order to repair it as close to factory as possible and guarantee it for life life like I've done for over 35 years, what would be the only "best practice" in professional circles.  You pick one.  :) 

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I have one and have used it when necessary. Sometimes it is just impossible to get to the source end of a wire. If I can pierce the wire I can wrap a piece of tape around it. No more harmful  than splicing a wire which we all have done at one time or another.  

 

Remember that there are times when in order to get to the site connection, you would have to practically dismantle half of the mechanicals on some cars and tractors. These devices are not NASA space ships. I have never had a failure from doing this.

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You ever try the liquid tape Nick, it's the bomb.   :)

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No I haven't, but I do keep a roll of rubberized tape here. It makes a good water proof seal.

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You have no choice but to use something like this if you have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it. 

 

You have 4 choices,

 

#1 - use piercing leads

#2 - get out the knife and skin it back all over the place like most do

#3 - pull the harness apart and start looking then have to put it all back as it was

#4 - run a new wire

 

In order to repair it as close to factory as possible and guarantee it for life life like I've done for over 35 years, what would be the only "best practice" in professional circles.  You pick one.  :)

 

Anybody?  :popcorn:

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I think i hear crickets ... possibly...maybe... yeah pretty sure those are crickets

 

:ychain: :ychain:

Edited by KyBlue
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Anybody?  :popcorn:

No actually you would do a voltage drop test on the circuit and then go from there. You can always get a connection at the start and end of the circuit by back probing.

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I already know that, that is how I know I have a problem in the circuit in the first place.  That doesn't help me find where the problem is in the wire within the harness...    Please read my post.

 

You have no choice but to use something like this if you have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it. 

 

You have 4 choices,

 

#1 - use piercing leads

#2 - get out the knife and skin it back all over the place like most do

#3 - pull the harness apart and start looking then have to put it all back as it was

#4 - run a new wire

 

In order to repair it as close to factory as possible and guarantee it for life life like I've done for over 35 years, what would be the only "best practice" in professional circles.  You pick one.  :)

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why pierce the wire allowing moisture (rain or humidity) into the wire? that is just a terrible idea! there are other ways than piercing the insulation, i.e. finding a connector and checking there, and if you need the circuit to be complete, then back probe the connector, never pierce the wire insulation your just asking for problems. and if you already know there is a problem in that circuit, why make more problems within that circuit by poking holes?

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Is no one reading my posts?  :banghead:

 

We have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it.  The problem is between the front of the engine lets say at the crank sensor, and the computer.  How do we find the open (break) in the wire?  :eusa-doh:

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I already know that, that is how I know I have a problem in the circuit in the first place.  That doesn't help me find where the problem is in the wire within the harness...    Please read my post.

I read it just fine. I guess we just diag things differently. If it works for you that's fine, but I don't do it that way.

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Is no one reading my posts?  :banghead:

 

We have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it.  The problem is between the front of the engine lets say at the crank sensor, and the computer.  How do we find the open (break) in the wire?  :eusa-doh:

Voltage drop at the connectors. I have never seen a single wire run the full length of a circuit on a Auto.

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Is no one reading my posts?  :banghead:

 

We have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it.  The problem is between the front of the engine lets say at the crank sensor, and the computer.  How do we find the open (break) in the wire?  :eusa-doh:

 

yes people are reading your posts, do you read your posts? you stated in your first post that it does no damage to the wire:

 

These are piercing leads for testing that I've used for many years.  Just thought if you guys didn't know about them I would put one on here.  You can hook it to a meter and go like crazy or put a test light into the banana plug end and do the same.  Makes life fast and easy and does no damage to the wire.  :)

 nobody stated your method wouldn't work, it is the first statement that is being debated, and members are stating their thoughts and experiences about the leads like you stated your thoughts about them.

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Voltage drop at the connectors. I have never seen a single wire run the full length of a circuit on a Auto.

 

I know that also, I have over 35 years experience specializing in electrical and master certifications that are not important now but, how do you find the break, open or short in the harness between connectors.

 

 

I am past the first post Prondzy. You even just quoted my question and still must not have read it.  "We have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it.  The problem is between the front of the engine lets say at the crank sensor, and the computer.  How do we find the open (break) in the wire?  :eusa-doh:" 

 

 

 

This same question has been asked and quoted 7 times in here with no answer.  I would just like a simple answer. 

 

You have no choice but to use something like this if you have an open wire that needs to be found in a computer harness that has 5 miles of wire in it. 

 

You have 4 choices,

 

#1 - use piercing leads

#2 - get out the knife and skin it back all over the place like most do

#3 - pull the harness apart and start looking then have to put it all back as it was

#4 - run a new wire

 

In order to repair it as close to factory as possible and guarantee it for life life like I've done for over 35 years, what would be the only "best practice" in professional circles.  You pick one.  :)

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Voltage drop at the connectors. I have never seen a single wire run the full length of a circuit on a Auto.

Geno

  Its been answered, you jut don't like the answer. Is this not the answer you were looking for. I know it wasn't one of your options. :eusa-think:

Edited by WH nut

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