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Commando rear?

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Wasn't sure if the 1-1/8" numbers were in there...going to check now. 

Humm...is the Torrington B-1816 # at the bottom of Steve's third PDF the one I'm in need of? 

Edited by AMC RULES
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Would have been nice to drain it first.  :ychain:   Stick a pan under the axle housing and pull out the differential (that will get most of it).  You need to take some good measurements, once it is cleaned up and let's try to figure out what happened in there.  I think the Wheel Horse Gods were good to you...you would have put a bad seal on top of a bad bearing and put it back on the horse...and the horse would have thrown that shoe again.  :bow-blue::)   You just saved yourself a few days of OMG...NNNOOOOOOO!!!!!   :woohoo:

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Yucky Yucky Messy Messy!! How's it smell?  :ychain:  :teasing-poke: Throw away your clothes! Yup when new parts fail or give you problems it's always something stupid. Post # 20 I said take it apart. Wish my football picks were as good as my repair advice. Should have taken it apart in your living room. The carpet would have absorbed the extra oil (No kitty litter needed! $$$$) and you could have watched monster movies while working on it. :ychain:  I'm sure the Big Guy will help after he climbs out of the tree after last night's game. :)

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Wasn't sure if the 1-1/8" numbers were in there...going to check now. 

Humm...is the Torrington B-1816 # at the bottom of Steve's third PDF the one I'm in need of? 

 

if you have 1 1/8 axles........

the B-1816 is the 1 1/8 axle bearing. 1816 = 18/16 of an inch. (18/16 = 1 2/16 = 1 1/8) B is open bearing. this is how i remember which is which. i read this on a torrington reference somewhere....

 

 

 

 

other examples would be...

 

 

B-108 (108 10/16 and 8/16.........  5/8 x 1/2) etc...

M is a closed bearing, B is open.

 

M-12121 ( 12  12  1.......12/16 x 12/16 x  1.........     3/4 x 3/4 x 1 ......M -closed). 

Edited by Martin
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Definitly the bevel gear differential...If I was you Craig I would also pull it apart and check the internal gears...This is the same differential in the 953-1054 trans and are know to be weak....but the 953-1054 ia alot heavier machine than the commando..The gears are known to crack and the plates inside that float with the pin that hold the other set of gears are known to crack and break....I have replaced a few of them...also have swapped in the 8-pinion differential in them too....This goes to show that just what the books say isn't always right..I have learned something new by this Thread..And it is good to know..Thanks for the great pics!!!!

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If I was you Craig, I'd get me some of that chocolate milk. You really need to let us know what it tastes like. I see you've been saving it instead of draining it. Cmon now, you're holdin' out here.........

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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On a more serious note, would you knowledgeable folk, (you know who you are) say this trans is the same as the 65-67 1 1/8 axle 3 speeds? My 1057 had the same bevel gear center.

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I am far from knowledgeable on these. All I can do is relay what I find in manuals and don't mind being corrected.

 

When the older manuals started to disappear online it was time to post the ipl's for the transmissions just in case. I titled them all using the number of forward speeds and axle diameter so search the manuals using forward speeds and they will all come up. Next step is to change the Submission date at the top of the page to Title. Then change Descending order to Ascending order. Now you can scroll down the page. Each 3-speed has a 3A, 3B or 3C etc following the axle diameter. The A's are all interchangeable. The 3C's are all for the 953, 1054 and 1054A. The 4th 3C is a transmission that was available from parts after 1965. 

 

Next is the 5058 transmission (3E) in this thread and was only used in 1967 according to the parts lists for the tractor models 1057 and 1257. What is odd is the parts list identifies it as a 5080 transmission but in the notes Use 5058 as a complete replacement. The 5080 doesn't show up until 1971 in the WorkHorse 800 and it has 1" axles and 4 spur pinion gears. How did that end up in a 1967 manual?

 

I think the 5080 in the 1967 manual is a mistake but why didn't they catch that? I doubt the complete service transmissions came with hubs because they came less the shifter as per an earlier bulletin. 1-1/8" hubs won't fit the 1" axles. And where did they get the 5080 in the 1967 manual when the transmission wasn't used until 1971?

 

One observation using this progressive transmission list is all the 1964 transmission model numbers were replaced in 1965 with new model numbers. I suspect the reason was the revised shift rails and detent parts that were released in 1964.

 

Interested in your thoughts.

 

Garry

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thanks for that info Garry, id like to see what Steve and Mike have to say about all this.......

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Martin...if you pull up a copy of the transmission manual, you can see what horses come with what transmissions.  The #5045, 5047, 5051, 5059 and 5058 were all basically the same heavy duty bi-level gear differential transmissions with 1 1/8" axles.  So, looking at the list...those transmissions are in the 1054, the 1965/1054A, none in 1966, and the 1057 and 1257,  If the list is correct, that is where they are.  :)

 

Thanks Garry for telling us how to do searches for these manuals.  :)

Edited by stevasaurus
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Finally got the trans fluid drained, and cleaned up a bit...

visually, everything looks OK in there, found no bits in the bottom...

gears seem pretty good, all except for that B-1816 needle bearing in the axle tube.

I'm hoping I can just replace it, add a new axle seal, then button it back up.   :handgestures-thumbsup:  

post-3498-0-82266700-1412122316_thumb.jp

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post-3498-0-81191200-1412122436_thumb.jp

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post-3498-0-20052600-1412122453_thumb.jp

post-3498-0-85814700-1412122461_thumb.jp

post-3498-0-30661300-1412122470_thumb.jp

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post-3498-0-38129700-1412122491_thumb.jp

post-3498-0-05857400-1412122504_thumb.jp

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Looks pretty good. I would use some emery cloth on the axles and get them nice and smooth so when you slide the new seals over they go on without damage. Check to make sure the bolts holding the bull gear together are tight too. 

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Id change the bolts on the differential as long as your in there. You don't know how stressed they are. It dosen't

cost that much for the bolts and nuts.

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Was able to get the new bearing in, all the seals replaced, and the case halves cleaned up and ready to go back together...

is using a gasket between the two imperative,  or will a sealer like Yamabond suffice here?    :confusion-shrug:

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I would use a gasket and sealer. I have an 8 speed to split back open that I only used a gasket on when I  put it back together. :eusa-doh:

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yes, toro #3912 and wh #3912 are one and the same....

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Don't forget to put oil in it!  :teasing-poke:  :teasing-poke:  :teasing-poke:  :)

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