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Be careful using a 12V test light for diagnosing a problem. They come with 9V bulbs in them. All they do is tell you that you have SOME voltage present. A nice bright light at the solenoid for instance may not be enough voltage to spin a started ect. Use a meter to confirm the correct amount of juice is present.

A nice bright bulb tells you a lot. It means that there is a good clean connection. Dim bulb says there is a dirty connection. Usually a corroded ground wire. I have used this several times in the last week to diagnose a problem. Never would have thought of it either if someone else here had not suggested it to me.  

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It's the whole voltage vs amperage thing.  A test light should always be the first choice, multi meters can get you into missing things too many times.  :)

 

Is it running Tommy?  :woohoo:

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Well, I changed the post...nothing. :bitch:  :confusion-scratchheadblue: I didn't have a chance to get a meter yet, got busy on another project today, that's my project for tomorrow. Will keep you all posted.

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Gimme a call if you like, will be in the shop all day tomorrow.   :)

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Okay...Checked everything with the multi meter, seems that everything is hot but the two small post on the solenoid. Checked grounds, removed a little more paint in one area, put it all back together...nothing. Bad solenoid? I really didn't know they could go bad :confusion-scratchheadblue: .

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You jumped the solenoid mentioned in an earlier post here and it worked.  No multimeters for this type of problem, test lights only.  :)

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I don't want you to take this the wrong way, but when you are working with a part that is not correct, it makes the whole long-distance troubleshooting process that much harder. So go and get the right solenoid. It should only cost you about $10.00, and it will take one of your problems out of the equation. 

 

The following precautions should be in place before attempting the following tests:

Transmission in neutral.

Ignition switch in the OFF position.

Heavy cable from solenoid to starter disconnect at the solenoid.

 

With the solenoid in place, and the (+) battery cable connected to one of the large lugs, and nothing connected to the other large lug, with the key off, take your multimeter, put it in the DC volts mode, connect the black probe to ground, then touch the red probe to the large lug connected to the battery. You should have 12 volts. There should be no voltage at the other large lug, or at the small lug. 

 

Now with the key still in the off position, connect a small jumper wire to the SMALL lug of the solenoid. Next, momentarily touch that jumper wire to the LARGE lug that is connected to the (+) battery. The solenoid should give you a loud click, indicating that it is closing the contacts on the inside. When those contacts close, the other large lug becomes hot (meaning that it has 12 volts as well). That is where the starter gets it's voltage from. If the cable from the starter was connected to that lug, the starter would engage. 

 

Once you have established that you have a working solenoid, remove the small jumper wire.

 

Now look at where the (+) battery wire is connected to the solenoid, There should also be a small 14 or 16 gauge wire connected there going to the (+) side of the ammeter. From the other side of the ammeter, a wire should go to the B terminal of the ignition switch. 

 

With your multimeter in the DC voltage testing position, securely connect the black probe to ground, and touch the red probe to the B terminal of the ignition switch. You should have 12 volts. If you don't you may have a bad ammeter, or bad connections to the back of the ammeter. If you do have 12 volts at the B terminal, then remove the red probe, turn the ignition switch to ON or RUN. You should now be able to place the red probe on the (+) terminal of your ignition coil and have 12 volts.

 

Now find the end of the wire that should connect to the small terminal of your solenoid. Connect the red probe to that wire and turn and hold the ignition switch in the start position. You should have 12 volts. If you do, then connect that wire to the small lug, turn the ignition switch to start and the solenoid should click.

 

Reconnect the starter cable to the unoccupied large lug, and start your tractor.

 

 

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What he said

Edited by km3h

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Excellent Bob...bet your fingers are tired.  :)

Edited by stevasaurus
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Excellent Bob...but your fingers are tired.  :)

My Chrome browser presented me with an "aw snap" message just as I was finishing. It made me reload the page. Thought I had lost all that typing, but it was still there. Didn't want to have to rethink that one again. :scratchead:

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I don't want you to take this the wrong way, but when you are working with a part that is not correct, it makes the whole long-distance troubleshooting process that much harder. So go and get the right solenoid. It should only cost you about $10.00, and it will take one of your problems out of the equation. 

 

 

The solenoid worked and cranked the engine 17 posts before this one.   :)

 

We're gonna drive poor Tommy insane with all this stuff.   :laughing-rolling:

Edited by Geno
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We're gonna drive poor Tommy insane with all this stuff.

It's all part of the sickness we call Wheel Horse collecting. [emoji2]

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:laughing-rofl: Bob, you'd better go lie down, you have to be drained after that. I didn't know I had the wrong solenoid, but If I do, I'll replace it tomorrow before I do anything else. What kind should I ask for? Gene, it didn't actually crack, it just turned when I bumped the jump from battery to the small post on the left. I had it connected to the right post at the time, so I changed it and now it does nothing again. Everybody please bear with me, I'm slowly learning. :bow-blue:

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If the engine turned over the solenoid is good, the problem will be before the solenoid.  :)

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We are a patient bunch. There is nothing that I like more than to have a horse try to outwit me. We will work with you until the issue is resolved. What Geno said about the solenoid is probably true, there may be nothing wrong with yours, just one too many places to connect wires.

 

Before you go out and buy another one, try this. With the solenoid mounted to the tractor, take a jumper wire from the (+) of the battery to one of the small terminals. If the solenoid clicks, it's okay, and that is the terminal to connect the S (start) wire to. If it doesn't click, then try touching the wire to the other small terminal. If that one clicks, that is the correct one. If neither click, go get one of these:

 

post-2221-0-65234600-1407979467.jpg

 

http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/buyers-motor-solenoid-12v?cm_vc=-10005

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Bob...ever think about doing a couple of videos???  :eusa-think:  Words are cheap, pictures are worth a 1,000 words...videos are worth a $1,000,000.  I'm a dinosaur stuck in the 21st century...come on in...it is not that bad.  :ychain::)

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Videography is not my strong suit. The best tutorials are done with a second person doing the camera work.

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Nothing personal Steve :orcs-cheers:

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It's OK...it would be nice to have a second for doing the videos.  :)

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Check to see if the small posts on the solenoid are labeled 'S' and 'I' If so, connect to the 'S'. The 'I' post is the resistor bypass like Garry mentioned. It can just be ignored.The solenoid ground is achieved through the mounting bracket.

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He was out at NAPA when I talked to him this morning picking up the correct solenoid with only 1 small post.  :icecream:

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All is well!!! Installed the new solenoid and everything worked just right, engine turns, got power everywhere that should have. I re checked everything with the light prior to installing the new solenoid and the old one was definitely garbage. Bob, you were exactly right about starting with the right parts (solenoid). Gene, your explanation today of the way things should work was a big help in determining the problem. It's all a matter of experience, you folks have it and I'm trying to get it. The engine wouldn't crank, seems to have a minor fuel to carb problem, but I know a little bit about that part, so I won't be asking a lot of ridiculous questions about that. Thank you all for the wonderful assistance. PS I hope to post some pictures in a few days when the hood dries.

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That's great. Glad to hear you now have a running Horse in the stable.

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Way to go Tommy.  :eusa-clap:

 

Now we need pics!  :teasing-poke:

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