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Indy443

Rear tires keep going flat...

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This problem began towards the end of mowing season. Out if nowhere I'd begin to mow and realize something isn't right. Sure enough I look down and see that both tires are running nearly empty. Ok, no big deal, get 'em pumped up and finish up. Happened a few more times and it became irritating. Now that it's winter I've switched over to weights and chains. I fully inflated the tires after putting on the chains and then covered up the tractor in wait for the first snowstorm. Today I pressed on the rear tires and sure enough they are totally flat. It seems they are flatting out all the time now.

Is there a cure for this? I'd not be all that enthusiastic about having to purchase two new rears.

Thanks-

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Tubes

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Slime tire leak repair. Just used some on one of my Wheel Horse tires that kept going flat. Not been flat since I "slimed" it.

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If you use the "Slime" and at a later date remove the tire, you will be very upset with yourself for making the slimy mess.

 

Tube them!

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Yep, heard of it. Never used it before. Spray in type application, then reinflate behind it?

Slime tire leak repair. Just used some on one of my Wheel Horse tires that kept going flat. Not been flat since I "slimed" it.

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As in re-tube them? Or do they not run tubes from the factory (dumb question?).

If you use the "Slime" and at a later date remove the tire, you will be very upset with yourself for making the slimy mess.

 

Tube them!

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No tubes from the factory

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Slime it,I have used it for several years.Your leaks are probably around the rim,or weathered and sidewalls are leaking. I only put about half the amount that is recommended and it has never failed me. And I don't really care about the mess inside the tire,it doesn't  bother me.

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Does the slime hold up for all weather conditions? How does it do in the very cold weather?

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What do you do when you get a hole in the tube ? Can you break the tire down and patch it yourself. Do whichever you want,I'm just telling you what works for me and has worked for several years and on at least 20 tires.

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If you don't feel like buying tires don't slime it. If you ever do break it down you will be buying wheels and tires. Just imagine someone blowing their nose to fill your tire.And then the rim rust. Not pretty to get clean.

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Indy - comes down to this

 

1 - quick fast repair -slime it

2 - Tubes- pull chains / weights , pull wheels , break down & install tubes- reassemble

 

all depends how much time you have on your hands :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

chasm  :flags-waveusa:

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I have never had any luck with the green slime stuff.  I had a slow leak in the rear tire of my JD LT-160 once and slimed it.  I followed the directions and rolled the tire around.  It didn't fix the leak, so I took it to a tire repair shop.  They put in a tube but didn't clean the rim :no: For the next two years I had slime leaking out thru the valve stem hole in my rim.  It sure can make a mess.  Just my $.02

Edited by WheelHorse79

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Do not use slime! A previous owner of my b 80 used slime on one of the tires, when I removed the tire for restoration, the wheel was badly corroded. All the other wheels were fine but that one was a mess inside and out. It is a quick easy fix but it sure messes things up. Get tubes.

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Everything readers have said here about slime is true.  However, no one has yet suggested to find the root cause of the leak.  Is it possible that the the tire valves are the problem?  Spray some soapy water on the valve (after the tire has been reinflated of course) and look for bubbles.  Better yet, immerse the tire in a tub or wheel barrow and again look for bubbles.  Yes, you do have to break the bead to replace a valve, but it is cheaper than a tube and IMO easier to get it inside.  If slime works, great, I have done it myself, but there is a drawback as so many have pointed out.

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I don't think this question has been asked, but how old are the tires? I had a tire that was leaking through the sidewall. Tiny cracks finally penetrated the tire and started to leak. Having asked that, I would also suggest that the area of the rim where the tire bead seats has gotten rusty, and the bead is not sealing. The water test as described above will show leaks wherever they happen to be.

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Tube it, enough said! Are you keeping the tractor? Is it your favorite? Myself I would tube it without asking questions. #1-Smart way tube it! #2 lazy way- slime it. End of my story same as everyone else's

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Why on earth would you guys suggest remedies that don't include finding the cause of the problem?  Yep tube it.... and if it's a small nail or screw that got picked up, it'll puncture that too.ruinedxmas.gif

 

Find the cause.  Could be a nail, thorn or sharp stick, could be weather cracks, could be a loose valve stem... could just be a leaking bead that all you need to do is re-seat.  Why spend.gif buy a solution to a problem you don't understand?

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Yep, I have a feeling that rmaynard is on to something. If I were to wage an educated guess, these are the original tires that rolled off the showroom floor (tractor is a '92 312-8). The treads are pretty worn down and the sidewalls do not look 'fresh' by any means. I am wondering if when the wheels rotated around when the tires were basically flat, if that didn't cause any cracks in the sidewall to enlarge to the point where the tires are basically holding air for a few days at most. 

 

I think you have all convinced me not to slime.  Here is my dilemma at the moment. It is winter in Vermont. I don't have a garage. Working with ungloved hands for long (I know wahhh), becomes unpleasant quick. 

 

I have also never broken a tire down before. I've taken the tire off without any problem, but breaking beads, putting in tubes, reseating beads. That I've never done. Would I like to learn to do it? Heck yes.

 

 

I don't think this question has been asked, but how old are the tires? I had a tire that was leaking through the sidewall. Tiny cracks finally penetrated the tire and started to leak. Having asked that, I would also suggest that the area of the rim where the tire bead seats has gotten rusty, and the bead is not sealing. The water test as described above will show leaks wherever they happen to be.

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Get at tube from a place like Tractor Supply or garden tractor dealer.  Take the wheel off and bring it to the nearest tire shop.  Pay $10.00, put the wheel back on and you will be good to go.  Doing it yourself is not worth the time and aggravation. jmho

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I've used both slime and tubes.  Where I mow, there is a fair amount of briars, etc. and tubes just haven't worked for me.  Absent any other solution, I'm using slime.  Seems to work good.  Haven't broken down a wheel yet to see if there is rust.  Sometimes though - even with slime (after it gets some age), the tire will leak down if you leave it setting for a long time - like over winter.  I have found that airing up and driving around redistributes the slime and it re-seals.  I've got several spare rims, so no worries with slime rusting (the tubless slime is supposed to have rust inhibitors in it) out the rims.

 

Good luck,

Bill

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What Jack said.^^ My tire shop does things like that free because I buy all my tires there.

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I put tubes in Marvin 's ag's took them to a tire place and it was $23 a tire including the tube. We'll worth it to me. No aggravation

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If you use the "Slime" and at a later date remove the tire, you will be very upset with yourself for making the slimy mess.

 

Tube them!

Agree on all counts !!

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