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Engine Stalls When Battery Is Disconnected

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I have a B-80 with a Kohler 8hp engine that dies when I disconnect the battery.. Is that normal?

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Yes you remove the power to coil. It is just like turning off the key.

 

Jim

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that is the one thing that I don't like about the k181 in the b80, and my 73 8hp. the ignition runs off of the battery.

 that can be a problem if you are mowing or other chore and aren't close to home. if the charging system fails, you won't know it until the engine dies, and then you cannot restart the engine to limp back home. you will have to remove the battery and charge it, then return with it, to start the engine.

don't ask me how I know this(more than once) :angry-cussingblack:

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that is the one thing that I don't like about the k181 in the b80, and my 73 8hp. the ignition runs off of the battery.

 that can be a problem if you are mowing or other chore and aren't close to home. if the charging system fails, you won't know it until the engine dies, and then you cannot restart the engine to limp back home. you will have to remove the battery and charge it, then return with it, to start the engine.

don't ask me how I know this(more than once) :angry-cussingblack:

Add a voltmeter to your ignition circuit so you can monitor the charging system.

 

Garry

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Ok guys thanks!!    My volt meter is showing a slight discharge when the motor is running so I guess it is time to do a little detective work and see if it is really charging.

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Add a voltmeter to your ignition circuit so you can monitor the charging system.

 

Garry

 

are you talking about an aftermarket digital voltmeter? I have a factory ammeter from a b80 that I am getting around  to installing.

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I like the 2" aftermarket voltmeters that look like the original ammeters. They tell you a lot more than an ammeter, easier to read and cheaper to purchase but are wired different than an ammeter.

A 1 or 2 amp charge could be normal but you are hard pressed to read that on an ammeter.

A 1 or 2 amp discharge is also hard to read that on an ammeter.

A voltmeter will show +14 volts with a 1 amp charge if everything is normal. 

A discharge will show 12 volts.

Easy to distinguish between the two.

 

Garry

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A multi-meter should be used first before installation of either amp or voltmeter to show how much voltage is registered.  A 12V battery reads 12.7 at full charge and a reading ABOVE that is indicating a charge.  A charge will be 12.8-14.7, but good normal readings in the 13.5-14.7 indicates that the alternator is delivering its full charge.

 

When you know the amperage reading and the voltage reading from discharge to full charge you are able to recognize theses amps or voltage reading on meters and now they will make sense.

 

A charge of 1 amp is still charging but not very visible to auto type meters.

 

To make reading a meter easier the 12 V system is really 10-15 VDC, and a meter with full scale at 15 V is able to be seen better when charging compared to a 20 V full scale.

 

Ammeters in automotive are tough to read because of the small amperage most tractor alternators produce and the difference of the battery and the alternator voltages...it is this difference in voltages and the corresponding amperage that results in the movement of an ammeter.

 

If you have the ability and equipment a good multi-meter will show all aspects of an alternator, whether Permanent Magnet or field produced by a battery.  

 

The easiest test of a charging system is test battery voltage just after starting a cold engine, reading should be higher than a fully charged battery 12.7

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