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Dieselcowboy

Calling all loader tractors.

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I have 130 pounds on each rear wheel, 4.5 x 11.5 steel, and 200 pounds of suitcase weights on the rear. 460 total. The suitcase weights made the biggest difference, I believe  because the weight is over hung on the rear axle. I think 300 pounds over hung would work the same as the 460 combination. I had a D160 and used a weight box on the three point, it had about 300 pounds in it and worked fine on the level. A little tricky on the hill.

Joe

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Alright, thanks for your info! I think i stick with the 440lb i have right now and see how it works. I also have BIG weights in the 15 inch rearwheels.... dont really know their weight but they are a pain in the ass to mount in the rims... I think i need a bit more counterweight than you guys with traditional loaders. My loader weights around 260 lb and everything hangs on the front hitch, which also has some weight... Now i also have 8 layer "skidsteer" rearwheels, so i think that will be fine, don't know how much weight the rearaxle can handle though....

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Here is my 1966 Case 190 with Johnson loader.  I am waiting for Spring to tune-up and use this tractor.  

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I know the KWIK-WAY, model 45-08211, owners manual says for a 350 lbs of payload, they recomend a min of 280 lbs. counter weight. Optional weigt box. Just thnking the rear axles on a largter machine are 1 1/8", that is pretty good size. I know I have trailer axles that are 1 in and they take a pretty good load. just some fuel for thought??

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A word of caution.  Be careful moving the tractor, with the loaded bucket raised very high. With the narrow, standard, track width, and a high loaded bucket, tipping over, when hitting a pot hole, etc. can be dangerous. 

For this reason, the po of my loader GT, installed rear wheels with a wide offset.

In the pic below, my WH 414-8 on the right has a 36" track width, and the Ford LGT 165/loader, with wide offset wheels, has a 49" track.

 

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My opinion only:

I don't disagree with needing more stability with a raised loaded bucket.

A wider offset seems like a good idea for stability, but the farther out the wheels are, the greater chance of breaking an axle because of the weight/leverage ratio.

 

I also know that a fully loaded bucket in below freezing temperatures puts addition stress on the front axles and WILL break an axle off the king-pin....BTDT.

When the 1st one broke and the weight shifed, the 2nd front axle broke!

Edited by KC9KAS

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Offset front rims on a loader/GT would cause strain on the f axles, but on the rear, with not much weight (sometimes none!) I don't see a problem.

With the empty bucket, and the tractor sitting there, I don't see any more stress on axles, compared to std rims.

Physics, wasn't my best class!

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Offset front rims on a loader/GT would cause strain on the f axles, but on the rear, with not much weight (sometimes none!) I don't see a problem.

With the empty bucket, and the tractor sitting there, I don't see any more stress on axles, compared to std rims.

Physics, wasn't my best class!

If you are using a loader you have weighted down (or should have) the rear end of your tractor with a weight box and a bunch of weight.

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I must be missing something here.

 

I have loaded rear tires, 80# of wheel weights, and 100#'s on the back.

Sitting still, with empty bucket, the off set wide rear rims, can't have any effect on the axles. It would be the same pressures, if the rims were removed and the axle flanges were resting on blocks.  Am I wrong here?

 

With the overloaded bucket, raising the rear wheels clear of the ground, I can see where the offset, would put the loaded tire wt, and wheel weights, further out, and increasing leverage, and putting more strain on the axles. Is this what you were talking about?

 

Inboard wheel weights would be nice!

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What I think about is how less stiff a pipe is the longer it is. So in mind, all weights being equal, if the pipe, or in this case, the load on the axle is further outboard, then you have a bigger fulcrum on the axle and that might cause some problems - just a thought, don't know for sure.

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I believe that the "fulcrum point" with the tractor sitting there, would be directly below the axle flange, whether it has narrow or wide rims. Now if you were to jack up one rear wheel, the load on the other axle, if it had wide, offset rims, would be greater, than if it had std. rims. 

Being as both rear wheels are on the ground, I don't see a problem.  

 

I'm more concerned with the front spindles! With a 300# bucket load, a 200# operator, 300# + weight on the rear, plus the 850# tractor weight, all 1650#'s could be on the front spindles!

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Wouldn't the "fulcrum" be the axle bearings?  To me, there wouldn't be any additional stress to the axle or bearings when sitting still.  Exact same tractor weight sitting on the exact same points of support.  The additional stress I could see being applied would be when in motion and the shifting weight of the tractor amplified by the load in the bucket.  But I guess if your trying to prevent a roll over, more leverage on that fulcrum is what your going after anyway. :twocents-02cents:

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So the axle is a stub - sticking out of the tranny. Think of as a cantilevered beam. The further out you place the load on the beam, the more stress is induced - via the rim placement on the hub, you have effectively made the axle longer. The axle sees more bending stress, where the axle is held in place sees more stress. Engineers call this load a "moment" and one way to think of it is force x distance from the fixed point.

In the end, the only practical way to know if it causes any harm is to use it. Heck there are lots of wheelhorse tranny replacements out there!

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At that rate, extend the WH frame around the tranny, and attach the wheels to your own heavy duty shafts mounted through easy to find industrial bearings and just use a chain to the original tranny axle. You could make it as wide as you want (with the frame) and not worry about the pricier WH bearings.

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At that rate, extend the WH frame around the tranny, and attach the wheels to your own heavy duty shafts mounted through easy to find industrial bearings and just use a chain to the original tranny axle. You could make it as wide as you want (with the frame) and not worry about the pricier WH bearings.

 

Interesting idea! I still think the front spindles will break, before the rear axles, when using a loader. Much higher loads, and smaller diameter.

Btw, my loader is on my Ford LGT 16, not my WH 414-8.

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I've done very little with it so far, but I am positive that it needs weight in the rear.  I'll figure something out, though! 

 

Here, I was just trying to see how she digs and moves and such.  She's still new to me, so I'm slowly figuring everything out  :)

 

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Edited by stratostar250

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I am drooling over all these loaders. :o  How much do these usually cost? $500-$1000? I would like to get a D250 with a back hoe and feet as well. How much would that be?

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I am drooling over all these loaders. :o  How much do these usually cost? $500-$1000? I would like to get a D250 with a back hoe and feet as well. How much would that be?

I've seen loaders go for 1500-2000 without a tractor, but you have to keep an eye out. Some go for cheaper. But I saw a d250 on craigslist with a backhoe and a bunch of attachments and its going for 7500

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YIKES! I think I will go for a truck first. :P The loader is now something for after I get a real job.

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YIKES! I think I will go for a truck first. :P The loader is now something for after I get a real job.

 

Haha, yeah, they aren't cheap, but keep an eye out and you may find one cheap! :handgestures-thumbupright:

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Haha, yeah, they aren't cheap, but keep an eye out and you may find one cheap! :handgestures-thumbupright:

 

 

Yeah I should get a truck first. Then I'll keep my eye out. :P

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