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Filling tires

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I can't believe what a difference loaded tires make for traction. Not only the weight but the momentum of the liquid rolling along give the tractor an "extra push" I all ready loaded the tires in my C 160. My Power King came with loaded rears but had CC in them and the wheels started rotting. I bought a pair of Farmall Cub tires and wheels but they where not loaded. Here's how I did it. I know it's not a :wh: but a tire is a tire and a tractor is a tractor.

First the fluid of choice RV antifreeze. Got it on sale at Lowes for $2.98 gal. I know washer fluid is cheaper but I wanted non toxic for my pets and this stuff comes with corrosion inhibitor.

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First problem. I can't get the valve core out due to the 100 lb. weight that I DO NOT WANT to take off. The core tool will not go in straight.

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Problem solved. modify core tool

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Next problem. Fill adapter I got at Napa for $14.00 won't fit again because of the weight.

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Problem solved. Went back to Napa and got a RV dual wheel tire stem extension hose. $23 but still better than removing weights.

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Borrowed a small elec pump from work. hooks up with garden hoses or in this case washing machine hose.

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When filling I pump in a couple of gallons then bleed out some air. Shutting off the pump allows the air back into the bucket and out. There is also a bleeder valve on the fill adapter

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I used the floor jack to let the tractor down to force out the air faster. Used 22 gallons.

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Necessity is the mother of invention. Good job.

Sent from my MB520 using Tapatalk 2

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I preach loaded tires. Having been raised on a dairy farm I know the unmistakeable difference in having loaded vs dry tires. As soon as I get another tractor I stop by the parts store and get two cases of washer fluid, cheapest thing and ok to squirt all over the world from our cars must be ok to use in my tractor tires, that said, I promote that having loaded tires really improves the whole handling "attitude" of the machine. I don't see a reason not to load the tires if it's a worker of any kind. It bellies the tire out on the surface giving optimal use of the tread. Unlike expensive weights that add down pressure but doesn't spread the tread out like loaded tires. That's my experience anyway. Get rid of those bouncy baloons!

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Very nice photos showing your work.

We have to be very skilled when it comes to our tractor hobby.

I bought the same fluid installation valve, but haven't used it.....I bought it AFTER I loaded my 1st set of tires!

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I have always run loaded tires on my Wheel Horses. They sure make a difference in traction in any and all surfaces. I've been lucky have not had any problems. Try them you will be pleasantly surprised.

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Boy, all those detailed pictures really help, and how you solved each problem. Really appreciated the steps. Great Job!

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I agree. I have loaded the front and rear tires on my 416. It does seem to make a big difference with traction and steering using the blower. Time will tell about the mower deck.

Let it SNOW!

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OK heard enough, I've often thought 'bout loading the tires.

The detailed information above and the source for the tubing has

made up my mind for me.

I have chains on, now for the tire weight. :-)

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We got 9" of snow out of Nemo. I used the Horse and blower on my driveway but used the King on my neighbor's as they have large gravel stone. I purposely put all his snow in one big pile then tried to push it.The tires didn't even begin to spin. This tractor is almost unstoppable now. :thumbs:

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I loaded tires on my c120 and it was great. I think I had 5 galons in each 23x10.50 12. I didn't use wheel weights and had plenty of traction. I have sence unloaded them because of small leaks.

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I run ATV tires on my tractors that I plow with, and no wheel weights and they do very well. It shouldn't make a difference but has anyone filled ATV tires? I would like to try

and fill them to give the tractor more rolling momentum.

Thanks, Gene..

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Gene,

I can't think of a good reason not to if you are using it in the snow at all. What I used was a chap transfer pump with one end in a bucket of windshield wash, and the other pushed on over the valve stem, after removing the valve core. I got about 5.5 gallons in each of my 23 X 8.5 ag tires.

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Don't know the napa part number but I know tractor supply has valve filler adapters in the tire repair section. I use a drill mounted pump from lowes and a couple garden hose fittings reduced down to 3/8" tubing, and four ft of clear 3/8" tubing. Just remove the valve core, lay the tire against something so it is past 45 degrees connect the valve filler adapter to the valve, connect 2' of hose to the adapter and the pump, connect the other 2' of hose to the other end of the pump, then just put the open end of hose in a gallon of washer fluid and run the drill pump in the correct direction at full speed until the jug is empty. Let the tire burp until no more bubbles come back through the pump and hoses, then pump in the next gallon. I get 6 gallons in each 23 x 8.50 x 12" tire. Allow 3 min per gallon with burping time, I think an hour total start to finish. Best spent hour and about $25 except for that time in Tijuana. Oh just kidding. LOL

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Can you fill the tires if you have tubes in them ?     :hide:

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Absolutely! By all means. Go for it. You won't be disappointed, tubes are even better yet. I recently was blindsided into an argument with another member on another topic but related to this one, who missed a point I was making, that loaded tires give remarkeble amounts of added traction. My personal examples were not believed and challenged by that member. I have nothing to prove, just wish everyone could experience the dramatic difference in traction. This would have been a good post for him to read through before his unmerited challenge and attack to my point.

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I took my tires off and layed them flat on the floor. Proped up the valve side about two inches off floor. I wrapped tape around the valve stem and shoved my funnel on tight. I would step on the tire so the air would go out them fill the funnel. Let it suck the fluid down. I got 6 gallons of washer fluid in my 9.50 tire . Added just under 50lbs a side. One tire had a tube and one didn't.

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Is there any advantage to using tubes? I was thinking that corrosion would be less of a problem. Is the extra expense of the tubes worth it?

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Good Idea Mike! :notworthy:  I wish someone years ago would have done that to the Rear Wheels my Senior! :crying-yellow:

 

~Duke

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I didn't seem to see, do you simply fill the tire or tube until there's no air left to bleed or do you have any air pressure at all?  I would imagine if the tire is completely full of fluid, it would create a hydraulic pressure and not allow the tire to go "flat" with the weight of the tractor on it. 

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We got 9" of snow out of Nemo. I used the Horse and blower on my driveway but used the King on my neighbor's as they have large gravel stone. I purposely put all his snow in one big pile then tried to push it.The tires didn't even begin to spin. This tractor is almost unstoppable now. :thumbs:

I bet. 8.9 lbs/gallon x 22 gallons = roughly 196 pounds. Plus your wheel weights.

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I got this somewhere on the internet. But I'm not sure if the weight is: beet juice, calcium chloride, or RV Antifreeze. These numbers are for some of the more common sizes for GT tractors.

             SIZE                 GALLONS                WEIGHT in POUNDS

  • 16x6.50-8               2.0                            21.4
  • 18x7.00-8               3.0                            32.1 
  • 18x8.50-8               3.4                            36.4 
  • 18x9.50-8               4.0                            42.8
  • 23x8.50-12             5.5                            58.9
  • 23x10.50-12           6.8                            72.8
  • 6-12                        3.6                            38.5
Other sizes will be + or - these numbers.

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I got this somewhere on the internet. But I'm not sure if the weight is: beet juice, calcium chloride, or RV Antifreeze. These numbers are for some of the more common sizes for GT tractors.

             SIZE                 GALLONS                WEIGHT in POUNDS

  • 16x6.50-8               2.0                            21.4
  • 18x7.00-8               3.0                            32.1 
  • 18x8.50-8               3.4                            36.4 
  • 18x9.50-8               4.0                            42.8
  • 23x8.50-12             5.5                            58.9
  • 23x10.50-12           6.8                            72.8
  • 6-12                        3.6                            38.5

Other sizes will be + or - these numbers.

I just looked up a gallon of RV antifreeze, weight showed as 8.9 pounds. I remember water is close to that, and jet fuel (kerosene/diesel) is about 8.6 if I remember correctly. It has been 30 years or so though.  :)

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