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Mr. 856

"Lazering" A broken bolt extractor from the block?

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Has anyone heard the term "lazering" a bolt or something along those lines? My K181S is at the machine shop. There is what appears to be a broken bolt extractor in the head bolt hole right by the exhaust. It looks to be fused into the block. Whatever it is has been here for god only knows how long. If I had to guess 30+ years by the way it looks to be part of the block. I discovered it when I took the head off to clean up the carbon and replace the head gasket. Suprisingly the engine ran fine like this but the piston did show signs of burning in that area. Anywho.......the shop said it was important to get it out. So they tried the nut/weld trick with zero success. So the boring, etc has been put on hold. So the term "lazering" was mentioned. Ive never heard of this but it just sounds expensive. So I told them to get me price If it can be done. So now I wait for the bad news. My other option would be to find a good useable block and have that one rebored, etc. What methods are out there to remove/retap something like this? How bad would it really be to just get the rebore done and leave the broken bit there and run it?

Here is what They/I are trying to deal with.

002.jpg

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This is one where I would like to hear what "buckrancher" would do. How 'bout this one Brian, what's the fix?

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I've heard of edm to do that, maybe a different word choice that means the same? :eusa-think: That tap cannot be drilled out, it's very hard but brittle. An edm will use electric current to burn the tap out without harming the block. It's not cheap, but cheaper than starting over with an unknown block to go thru.

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I have never heard of "Lazering", I think they are referring to EDM.

Another alternative might be to drill it out with a carbide endmill, carbide doesnt often loose that fight.

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Carbon EDM (electro discharge machining) is what I was around in high school, but I'm positive that technology has improved greatly in the last 25 years.

As Kiwi previously stated, there are drill bits and end mills that can cut through a tap or extractor, but you won't find them at the local hardware or big box store.

A good machine shop should be able to remove that object without any major issues.

I've seen that same thing on here before..........

Is this you? -

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You know I thought I had seen that picture before...........

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I've had success with a carbide burr in a hi-speed mini grinder.

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bridgeport mill and a good carbide endmill and 2000 rpms also a EDM machine like TT said we use one of them for small taps under 1/4-20 size

I could have that fixed that in no time( super simple)

Brian

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I have worked in a few shops that had what they called a tap burner but it was basically a light duty edm machine. I would try the carbide route first edm as a last resort it can really mess uo the threads if done wrong

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Is the motor at precision machine in Granby? They do all sorts of race engines :eusa-think:... they can't get it out? ... field strip the block and send it to Brian.

Edited by VinsRJ

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... field strip the block and send it to Brian.

Good idea. I have seen the results of Brian's repairs. After a severe torturing of a head bolt at the WHCC show in 2010, Brian took the engine home with him and worked his magic on it.

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We get broken taps wire EDM'd out all the time. It's way cheaper than making a new part.

Edited by Jim_M

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