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Kohler KT17 with blow rear rod. Worth Rebuilding?

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So I looked at a nice C-175 which is a friends. The rear rod blew thru the block. Is this worth rebuilding? It ran perfect with no knock, then all of a sudden........

Not sure why? A google search shows that the rear rod had oiling issues.

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doubt it would be worh it,if it has an auxiliry port hole now,i would look for another motor,if its gonna be a 17 try to get a series 2,they were better for oil starvation

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They can still fix the block as long as you have all the pieces. The big problem here is if it a series 1 or 2. If it is a series 1 then it is not a desired engine as the rod journals are drip fed. If it is a series 2 then it should be a drilled crank and be pressure fed to the rod journals. A series 2 would be worth fixing as long as the rest of the engine is in good shape. It is not cheep though! around a grand to rebuild a kohler twin doing every thing. A good used Kohler twin could be found for around $3-500. I have a KT17 series II with the same issue that I picked up for $100 for parts for my 3 other kohler twin's It had everything on it and so far I have used the fuel pump, carb, coil, stator and flywheel for its good magnets. The crank looks salvagible as the rod broke in the center, and didn't hurt the crank to bad.

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Seem like the twins in all manufacures were junk. Onan had intake valve seat issues. Briggs in general had valve seat issues but not as bad. Kohler has broken rod syndrome. What gives.

Ok now onto engine options. Can a briggs horizontal twin fit right on, or how about a nice 14/16hp Kseries?

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The original Kohler KT engines (series I) had a pressure spray oiling system that didn't take too well if the engines were used on a tractor that was used on slopes. Some of these brand new engines threw rods after only a few hours of use. These engines were a cost cutter version of the earlier Kohler K482/532/582 iron block twins which were very decent engines, although expensive and heavy. They just scrimped on the KT oiling system and paid the price for it. I would not rebuild any KT series I engine. The series II were much better with a drilled crank and full pressure oil system, but like Onan twins they are pricey to rebuild.

I'm not familiar enough with the C175 to know what could be used to repower it.

-Mark-

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The original Kohler KT engines (series I) had a pressure spray oiling system that didn't take too well if the engines were used on a tractor that was used on slopes. Some of these brand new engines threw rods after only a few hours of use. These engines were a cost cutter version of the earlier Kohler K482/532/582 iron block twins which were very decent engines, although expensive and heavy. They just scrimped on the KT oiling system and paid the price for it. I would not rebuild any KT series I engine. The series II were much better with a drilled crank and full pressure oil system, but like Onan twins they are pricey to rebuild.

I'm not familiar enough with the C175 to know what could be used to repower it.

-Mark-

I love my C-175, I mow with it daily to make a living.. When my series I motor gives up the ghost I am going to replace it with 10hp diesel. Just a thought.

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You can put about any engine in it, with the right parts that came factory in a WH, C series, 300, 400 or 500 series, so yes a single cyl. Kohler will be a bolt in with all factory parts, but there are two styles of K series blocks and you will need the correct oil pan and hardware to mount them in your tractor, also crank size WH used 1 1/8" diam. but most other brands used 1" but on the little 8hp WH they had 1" so PTO parts can be used off them to adapt the small crank.

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Worth rebuilding... maybe. If you plan to work it everyday I would not, but I did. Got a C-175 with a hole

in the block. Looked like a good place for the mud daubbers to build a nest, and they did. I tore it down,

used JB weld to patch the hole and reform some of the broken webbing inside the case. Found a used

JD engine to rob the pistons and cylinders out of. Cleaned the rod material off the crankshaft and got

a pair of rods. The crank was in good shape but had already been turned .010 under. So as close as

I can remember I have about $450 in this patch job doing all the work myself. I have a 42" deck under

it and have about 10 hours on it now.

One thing I noticed after the maiden mowing trip was the flywheel screen was covered solid. That

reminded me of when I had worked for a JD dealer when the first 317's came out with the KT17 engine

They were breaking rods like crazy. On that model the cooling air came from under the tractor and there

was a recall of sorts that involved installing a screen panel under the tractor. If there are any of these

left I bet it still has the screen under it. So as a fix for this I installed the 417 screen on the flywheel cover,

the screen still gets a circle of grass on the screen but can still pull air and keep the engine air flow going.

The JD problem caused the pistons to sieze in the cylinder and break the rods. Remember a few that the

rod was still loose on the crank with the rod broke. The spray system on the series I may not have been

the best but I believe would have worked fine if the engines were not starved for cooling air flow.

And that's my opinion and I'm sticking to it. Mike

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Cub Cadet had the same cooling troubles with the 682 and 782 that JD did with the 317 using KT17's in that the cooling air was drawn in from underneath and debris collected quickly around the flywheel screen. They also installed a screen in the airflow path under the tractor. Deere was so upset with Kohler over problems with the KT in the 317 and as no fix was available right away that they installed Onan P18's as warranty replacements and dropped Kohler engines altogether with the 318 model, and have only used Kohler engines in a few models since then.

If KT series I twins aren't used on any slopes, they last as long as any other Kohler engine and many are still in use today. It's just that when rebuild time comes it's often more cost effective to repower with something else.

-Mark-

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i would put a 16 hp kohler in her if they are avaiable in your area

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That C-175 will have a different shaker plate and belt guard, so if you go to a single pumper you need the shaker plate and belt guard but there are plenty of them around I have a series II on mine and I love that thing, the motor came of a simplicity from a guy at work who was scrapping the tractor picked it up for a song.

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That C-175 will have a different shaker plate and belt guard, so if you go to a single pumper you need the shaker plate and belt guard but there are plenty of them around I have a series II on mine and I love that thing, the motor came of a simplicity from a guy at work who was scrapping the tractor picked it up for a song.

Just my two cents, but I would leave the shaker plate (isolation mount?) off of the tractor. A single-cylinder 14 or 16 horse Kohler with the correct oil pan will bolt directly to the frame, without needing rubber mounts that all too often wear out.

A standard DEEP kohler oil pan can be drilled through and tapped very easily for use on WH tractors. The two holes on the PTO side of the block that hold the pan to the block should go all the way through and be tapped all the way. Using a drill press- Just use a smaller bit to get through from the top, and drill the correct bore from the bottom (up to the existing threads), then tap the holes from the top down using the existing threads as a guide.

There are many engine options for that C-175. Good luck with whatever you decide to do with it!

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