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stevebo

Fixing sidewall on Ag tire ?

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I have a very nice set of ag 6x12 tires that are in great shape except.... there is a 1.5-2 inch cut in the sidewall :banghead: . The tires are very pliable with no dry cracking. I was wondering if anyone has ever repaired a sidewall on these? I thought maybe a heavy duty patch on the inside and tube it? How would/have you handled the outside repair so it blends in? Is there a product like an epoxy of some sort that will work? I was thinking after the repairs are made the tires can be painted with Miller tire paint.

I ask becuase it is such a shame to not be able to use such a nice set of tires.

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I was told by a tire dealer that any part of the tire that does not meet the pavement cannot be patched or repaired.

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We fix farm tractor tires with a boot on inside of tire. U can buy them at most any good tire shop.

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Can't see why it can't be fixed. I could understand a car doing 65 on the highway, but top speed 7mph...I'd say go for it. Nothing to loose anyway.

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You can buy vulcanizing kits on line or most tire shops that deal in ag tires can do it or have it done for you.

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Can't see why it can't be fixed. I could understand a car doing 65 on the highway, but top speed 7mph...I'd say go for it. Nothing to loose anyway.

Especially if it's a just for show tire. :thumbs:

Why not try, what do you have to loose? :dunno:

If you do Steve, can we see how it came out before you remount it. :thanks:

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if you are only running 5-10 psi, it's hardly going to blow out. Plus you can put the scar/slit on the inside too if you reverse the tyres (assuming the split is on the outside edge)

We've repaired things like this with a big patch of inner tube :D

I'm assuming you are running tubes??

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Steve I had the exact same thing. Took it to a Goodyear tire shop, they threw a flat patch inside and coated it with some sort of rubber patch paste. They told me since I was using a tube it would be fine.

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We used to have farm tractor tires patched like this all the time ran with tubes and they are fine, usual suspect was a fence post from clearing out old fence rows

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I guess my tire dealer was referring to highway tires.

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I'm with meadowfield, patch it, put a tube in it, and put the cut facing the inside of the tractor. :thumbs: These things run such low pressure, you shouldn't have any problems at all.

Matt :flags-texas:

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I pot a patch on the inside and outside....put a tube in and no problems yet. Tire shops around here would not touch it though.

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I'd use a patch and tube. I've used dollar bills or gel pack wrappers and tubes on my mountain bike. I guarantee you I go a lot faster on my bike than your tractor!

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Steve,

Just throw that old thing out and buy new ones.

Oh yeah, buy the way,

I just happen to have a new set of those in stock! :happy-partydance:

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i agree with using the boot. my napa has sidewall boots listed in the book for AG-Tires. several sizes too. we bought some for the rear tires on our 8N there at the tire shop now.

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:) Miller tire has just what you need, on page 20 & 21 in their catalog. :flags-usa:

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As "blowouts" on these tractor tires aren't dangerous at a few MPH and often have all the power of a fart, you can easily repair that cut with a patch and tube.

-Mark-

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As "blowouts" on these tractor tires aren't dangerous at a few MPH and often have all the power of a fart, you can easily repair that cut with a patch and tube.

-Mark-

:laughing-lettersrofl::ROTF::laughing-lettersrofl:

Duff :thumbs: :text-thankyoublue:

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Chances are it would bulge with just a patch and a new tube.

An old timer showed me a trick years ago for just such a repair.

FIrst work the cut closed, scuff up the inside and apply a patch to the immediate area.

Next, take an old car tire, preferrably a radial. Cut out just the sidewall.

Take a large section of the sidewall and apply it just as you would a patch, coating both the homemade patch and the inside of your tire with patch cement.

Allow to dry and apply the patch overlapping the entire area by as much as possible.

Reinstall the tire with a new tube and check for any bulging of the area.

I've gone so far with a few as to line whole sides of a few tires with old tire rubber.

The rubber from a tire is corded, so it don't stretch like a patch will under pressure.

The first patch is to keep out dirt, the second is to reinforce the area.

I patched a tire like this for a friend over ten years ago and its still going strong.

You'll also find that if you take the tire apart later down the road, it'll be nearly impossible to peel away the adhered sidewall section inside.

I'd never try to run a tire with a casing cut tubeless again though, the presence of the tube is what helps hold the new patch in place inside the cut tire.

Without it, the flexing of the tire and immediate air pressure would work the patch loose rather quickly.

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One of the original 8" tires on one of my Wheel Horses had a sidewall hernia that was about two inches long but didn't bulge too much, as time went on it grew longer and I finally replaced the tires. A previous owner had cut the bead off a wheelbarrow tire and inserted it inside the old tire with a tube; had he rubber cemented it I would probably still be using it today.

Edited by 953 nut
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