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rmaynard

PTO Needle Bearing Replacement

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Has anyone successfully removed the needle bearing from a manual PTO housing without damage? Does it require any special tool?

I have 2 PTOs that I would like to rebuild. They both have bad bearings. I removed the needle bearing from one, but found that the outer case of the bearing is very soft material, and it gets damaged easily. I am afraid that I may damage the new ones putting them back in.

Any tips or pointers would be helpful. I do not have access to a press. Only standard mechanics tools.

Thanks

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Remove the stub shaft and/or "nose" (ball) bearing and use a piece of 3/8" (or bigger) threaded rod, a couple of large flat washers, and two hex nuts (that fit the threaded rod) to draw the new bearing into the pulley.

You can use an appropriately sized 1/2" drive socket to pull the bearing "beyond flush" so there's room to seat the seal.

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Sound like a plan. Thanks TT

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Good stuff here.

Mods, can we move this to the FAQ's and Mechanical Tips thread, please?

Thanks much! :hide:

~Duff

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I will document the installation of the new bearing with pictures. Will make for a better tutorial if they move it.

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I will document the installation of the new bearing with pictures. Will make for a better tutorial if they move it.

Excellent idea!

Duff :hide: :WRS:

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As promised, here is the pictorial on installing a new PTO needle bearing.

As I stated, I don't have a press, so with common hand tools, a piece of all-thread, and few large washers and nuts, I will install the new bearing.

Pictured below is my set up. PTO housing, new bearing, and tools.

I had a piece of 5/16" all-thread, so that is what I used. The large washers are 1-3/4" diameter.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install001.jpg

I started by seating the bearing squarely into the hole.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install008.jpg

Then I placed one small washer and one large washer on the end of the all-thread with a nut already in place.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install009.jpg

The all-thread was passed through the housing and bearing where another large washer and a small washer were placed on top of the bearing. A nut was run down the all-thread and snugged against the washers. I centered everything and began to tighten.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install011.jpg

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install017.jpg

Once the bearing was flush with the surface, I removed the nut and washers.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install021.jpg

I found a combination of washers that equaled 9/32", and placed them on top of the bearing. I continued to turn the nut until they were flush.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install018.jpg

This pushed the bearing to a depth of 9/32" below the surface to allow enough room to install the 1/4" thick oil seal.

052-11_PTO_Bearing_Install023.jpg

Job complete.

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NICE, another one to bookmark! :hide:

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I have never seen a caliper that reads in fractions :hide: Where in the world did you Find that at, wal-mart?

But you did do a great job of showing how to do it. Kudos to you on that........

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I have never seen a caliper that reads in fractions :hide: Where in the world did you Find that at, wal-mart?

But you did do a great job of showing how to do it. Kudos to you on that........

It reads in fractions, mm's and decimals. Nope, I didn't get it at Walmart. It's from General Tools, and is sold locally at Lowe's.

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Thanks for doing the pictures, Bob. :hide: (as you might have already noticed, I also got this moved to the FAQ/MT forum)

I use this technique on many bushings & bearings - including a few on the Case 580SL backhoe at work.

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I have never seen a caliper that reads in fractions :hide: Where in the world did you Find that at, wal-mart?

But you did do a great job of showing how to do it. Kudos to you on that........

It reads in fractions, mm's and decimals. Nope, I didn't get it at Walmart. It's from General Tools, and is sold locally at Lowe's.

I'll be dang, never seen one like that. I'll hafta get one for the wife, she can't read my Mitutoyo, it only reads in thousandths an mm's.

Thats pretty slick, how much was it?

By the way I can't quite make out the # on that brg so I don't hafta buy it from toro. Do you happen to remember what it was?

Thanx,

Ron

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The caliper is a cheapy. $39.99 from Lowe's.

The bearing is an SCE2420. Crosses to a Torrington J-2420 which is what came out of the PTO. Toro wants about $18.00 plus shipping, I paid $18.62 for two of them and that included S&H.

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:hide: for a great post. I'll be getting one of those calipers. Where did you order the bearings at?

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:hide: for a great post. I'll be getting one of those calipers. Where did you order the bearings at?

Found them on eBay. Got the seals from the same vendor. Don't know if he has more, but his ID is asisurplus

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The caliper is a cheapy. $39.99 from Lowe's.

The bearing is an SCE2420. Crosses to a Torrington J-2420 which is what came out of the PTO. Toro wants about $18.00 plus shipping, I paid $18.62 for two of them and that included S&H.

Yep, Toro.com's parts prices are just out of this world !! Makes you think thier parts are made of/from gold !!! We still have folks coming in looking for Wheel Horse parts and it sure makes you blink when you have to charge $80./90./100. for a part that used to sell for $20.00 or so. Yes, we're still giving 25% off Toro.com's price for all REMAINING STOCK parts. Someone went home this past week with some great buys.

(Yes, we still have requests to look into BTW.)

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How did you get the other side in? The Roller Bearing, Shaft PTO they are pressed fit also, snap ring inside and outside. The reason I ask I just took one apart that had a bad bell, the face was all groved deep. Not any good but good for practicing on. :woohoo:

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How did you get the other side in? The Roller Bearing, Shaft PTO they are pressed fit also, snap ring inside and outside. The reason I ask I just took one apart that had a bad bell, the face was all groved deep. Not any good but good for practicing on. :woohoo:

If you are referring to the ball bearing, I just tapped it in from the outside with a hard rubber hammer until it was flush, then used a piece of PVC pipe to finish tapping it home. Snap ring went in next, and the shaft was inserted from the inside with the inner snap ring attached. The outer ring was put on from the outside.

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That would be the most logical way :woohoo:

Chas

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excellent tutorial, even with several sets of bushing and seal drivers the homemade special tools are often times easier to use and do a better job :woohoo:

some of my best tools have to be made because no one sells them

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