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dgjks6

k181 rebuild

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Well, already got everything back from the shop. Too late to grind the valves, guess I'll have to figure that one out on my own.

The last piece arrived Christmas eve - got the new exhaust valve. Here is a shot of the old vs new:

DSCF6404.jpg

So I have to work tomorrow and tomorrow night and then I have 2 days off. In that time I hope to get a lot of reassembly done. Guy at the shop said once you get started don't stop until done because you don't want any dirt in there.

So last question - about the head - the carbon is taller than the place where the head gasket goes do I can't do the glass/sandpaper thing. Can I use a wire brush on a drill to clean the carbon off? It leaves micro scratches on everything, are these OK?

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I would use a scraper and one of the scrotch pads. If you dont have any, some 320 grit sand paper will work on a block of wood but dont over do it. When you install the valves with the cam on the compression stroke, meause your valeve clearance. Dont install the springs and keepers. If the clearance is to tight. but grind the end of the stem a little at a time until you get the proper clearance

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OK - so I am working on it today going through all of the inspection again... and find this:

DSCF6423.jpg

I am just wondering what you guys think because this baby is going back together anyway. Actually if I get a lot of don't do it responses I am going to quit.

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That's a crank bearing it's supposed to be there. :D :ychain:

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There are 2 hairline cracks and a divot (though the divot looks more like a casting defect)

DSCF6423-1.jpg

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I can't guarantee this, but those are probably parting or casting lines from the mold / casting process - not hairline cracks.

Those "divots" (as you called it) are also caused by the sand-casting process and normally mean nothing - unless they're in a critical location. (which isn't the case with yours)

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OK - going to use the block - now working on the head - see other post.

Now for the valve question

the machine shop lapped the valves, but recommended replacing the exhaus valve - so I got a new one.

Do I need to lap this (is that the correct term?) or can I just go ahead?

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You should, but I have gotten by not lapping. I guess it would depend on what the seat looks like

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You can lap it in place on the seat. Use a suction cup on a stick, and some lapping compound.

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I know I should have this thing together by now, but the one thing I have learned in life is preparation, prepartion, preparation.

So today I got valve grinding compund and lapped the exhaust valve. Then cleaned and cleaned and cleaned. Then covered the entire block with wd-40.

So the head I almost have flat, but during inspection I noticed this (don't you love photobucket with arrows?)

DSCF6472.jpg

This is the exact spot where the head is off. There is carbon there. I suspect the head gasket had a leak there.

So I am going to level the head as best I can, but I am going to keep my eye on ebay for another head.

I know you have heard this before, but I think I am ready to put it together tomorrow. The only other area I can find that isn't perfect is inside the valve holes. There is carbon build up there. Do I need to get this off? And how do you get it out?

Also any last words of advice or recommendations would be appreciated. I am off to clean the work space.

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Daily blog update.

Went through the Kohler manual page by page for inspection of the block. Everything is in spec. Cleaned my work area, got the kids around to watch the master (OK - I am exaggerating my expertise - but my kids don't need to know)rebuild the engine so they could learn.

Step 1 - put in main bearing. This was easy. This is the only part of the engine I did not remove - it spins well, and is quiet.

Step 2- put in governor gear... and torque to xxin/lbs. This is the point I realized I never ordered the small torque wrench. Off to ebay - and $30 later I am back to waiting for a package in the mail.

grand total of time sent on the rebuilding - less than 4 minutes. Number of swear words I can say in that time, well, that is classified.

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finally got my 8 horse painted up put together and back on the 80. went to crank it no spark, coil bad,then was not gettin fuel. now, i can kick my self with the excitement to here this thing run i failed to look inside the carb . was nasty dirty float was broken yada yada, dont get in a hurry . :ychain:

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finally got my 8 horse painted up put together and back on the 80. went to crank it no spark, coil bad,then was not gettin fuel. now, i can kick my self with the excitement to here this thing run i failed to look inside the carb . was nasty dirty float was broken yada yada, dont get in a hurry . :ychain:

Thanks for the advice. Keep the faith, you will get it running and with the work you put in, it will sound better than anything you ever heard in your life.

I am trying not to be in a hurry, but this is getting downright silly. Went to go to step 2 of the rebuild and had no idea about a governor, then I inspected mine and a few teeth were broke. $29 later new governor on order. And still waiting for torque wrench.

But today decided to assemble the governor so I new what I was in for. Going to start a new thread just for that.

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finally got my 8 horse painted up put together and back on the 80. went to crank it no spark, coil bad,then was not gettin fuel. now, i can kick my self with the excitement to here this thing run i failed to look inside the carb . was nasty dirty float was broken yada yada, dont get in a hurry . :ychain:

Thanks for the advice. Keep the faith, you will get it running and with the work you put in, it will sound better than anything you ever heard in your life.

I am trying not to be in a hurry, but this is getting downright silly. Went to go to step 2 of the rebuild and had no idea about a governor, then I inspected mine and a few teeth were broke. $29 later new governor on order. And still waiting for torque wrench.

But today decided to assemble the governor so I new what I was in for. Going to start a new thread just for that.

its the nickel and dime hose,clamps wires connector bolts n nuts stuff that flusters me i`m 12 miles from town one way so i buy in triplicat lol i did buy a ring compressorr and 3/8 torq wrench. i plan on findin a 16 horse :D

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Bored at work update. I got the governor thing figured out. Two washers were missing. A thrust washer and a copper washer. The thrust washer comes with the new governor gear I had to order. I decided to replace the copper washer for the governor retainer with a syntheitc washer. Its a hard plastic.

Why? A pack of 2 was $.63 and they fit perfectly. The copper washer was $2 and a bunch for shipping.

So I will post pictures as I go.

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I am no master mechanic,but at this point why would you do that for a few dollars.If you go to a major hardware store you could get the washer Im sure.

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The copper washer is for sealing purposes only. You might want to apply a dab of silicone gasket maker on the threads of the screw if you don't have the correct washer. :banghead:

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This is just an update. I really can't believe this, but it happened again. I got one more step before I found a problem.

I ordered a new governor gear, thrust washer and copper washer. The copper washer got here last night and when I got home form work I ran to the basement to complete the rebuild. I got the governor gear in place and the stop pin.

Nest stetp - tappets - went in perfect

Then the cam shaft. Perfect. Then measure endplay of cam shaft. With one shim it is .012. Spec is pont .005 to .010. Can you guess how many shims I have?

Now I have to go find a .005 shim

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I got the shims and the cam installed.

Now onto the crank and more questions.

1 - where is the timing mark on the crank? I can't seem to see it.

2 - how do you put the bearing in the bearing plate and make sure it is set and level? Do I need another tool or is there another way?

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It's the one in the bottom picture.

Put a dab of paint on it and the "dot" on the camshaft gear if they're too hard to see.

K-161Hobie015.jpg

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First I would like to offer my thanks to all who are helping me (esp TT). I could not do this without you guys.

I would like to apologize for my inexperience and all of my stupid questions.

Now that that is over, onto the question of the day. If you remember with me, the disassembly process at first was all of the parts, unlabeled into a box because I was never really going to try a rebuild. Well, now that has come to bite me in the...

I got the crank in and timed with the cam. I used a hammer (rubber, with the nut backed off the threads) as my press. Then I used an old bearing and a block of wood as my bearing installed for the bearing plate.

DSCF6757.jpg

Then I went to install the bearing plate and realized I needed screws from the mystery box. After sorting through 100 screws, nuts, bolts, etc. I came to these two options:

DSCF6758.jpg

DSCF6759.jpg

Is there a parts breakdown for the kohler engine - as far as nuts and bolts?

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Thank you. The one with the washers it is.

So I was, um, watching a friend I have put on a bearing plate. First he read the directions and decided to use two shims. He installed the bearing using a long plastic pipe to hit the middle of the bearing plate. It worked perfect, so he then measured the crank end gap and it was .025, which is .002 too much.

So he disassembled the bearing plate and added .010 of shims, assuming that would take care of the gap and put him in spec. Then he reinstalled the bearing plate using the plastic pipe and then tightened the bolts again. Now the end gap was .035.

Confused, he scratched his head and realized the shims increased the gap. So he removed the bearing plate again, and now removed all of the shims leaving him only with the gasekt. The he reinstalled the bearing plate, but it was going on at an angle.

Not being too smart he used the plastic pipe to drive it on, and broke the pipe. The he tried to tighten all of the bolts and still no luck. A closer inspection revelaed he had put the bearing plate on 45 degrees clockwise and it was hitting a piece of the block.

So off came the bearing plate and it was rotated to the correct position, but now he had no tool to install the plate, so in frustration he used a hammer, gently tapping the bearing plate close enough so the bolts would grab.

Then everything was tightened to spec and then gap was checked and was perfect.

Thank God that wasn't me. :banghead:

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