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Curmudgeon

Pulling rear hubs

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I used a three jaw puller but had to throw an impact wrench on it to get it to break the seal.

 

I would be very liberal with the PB blaster and letting it soak.

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NEVER bash at the inside face of the hub to try to hammer it off the axle. It will wreck the circlips retaining the inside end of the axle and also cause damage to the slot/splines where the circlip is fitted. Find someone (farmer engineer?) who has a really powerful (e.g. hydraulic) puller and exert the pulling force on the hub close to the axle, where the hub is strongest - i.e. do NOT attach the puller grabs/hooks to the outside rim of the hub or you could bend or break the hub.

post-8399-0-53516700-1405928263_thumb.jp

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 I already have a heavy piece of round plate used in pulling front hub bearings off a Dodge 3500 diesel. I can tell you that bolts threaded into the hub exert a nice controlled pull and are much better than hooking a 3-jaw around the lip of a hub.

 

 For most of us, finding a round plate of steel is expensive because it must be cut from something bigger. Fortunately, there are other options for thick steel rounds you might not realize exist, and i am talking about Rear disc brake rotors. I even got lucky enough to find one in the scrap pile from some GM car or other that the 5 drilled holes fit my wheel horse hub. It really should be no big deal to make a small heavy piece for that center bolt. If you already have a 3 jaw puller, it seems that you could place the puller without the arms installed in combination with the brake rotor and have at it. When i get some time after mowing season, it is something i plan to try.

 

 BTW, when using a threaded puller.it is a good idea to tap on the center bolt after it starts to feel tight. You can tell by the sound it makes that pressure is being relieved and that the hub is moving and unlikely to break at the bolt holes. Another idea is to cut pieces of iron water pipe or even use a socket on the end of the drive shaft to give more length to the center "pusher" bolt. i wish i had time right now to do the job this way and post pictures. Perhaps someone else will try it and tell us how it all works out.

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thanks Michael,that just said a thousand words.!!!!!!!   Great pic..

 

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