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yokomist

Frozen Transmission

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I know its generally not a good practice, but in the manual it talks about pushing in the clutch 3/4 of the way to shift while in motion... Any thoughts on this?

I've never seen a manual where they state you can shift while on the move, most (if not all) of the ones I've read tell you not to. Generally I dont shift at all while moving. It can be done,get the speed right and it will slip right in, but get it wrong and you mash the ends of the gears together - thats what has caused the rounded off edges and chips in the ends of the teeth on your gears.

Modern cars have syncromesh assemblies on the gears which are "brakes" to help get the gears spinning the same speeds before they are engaged. Obviously our tractors dont have them.

Your exhaust nipple looks well stuck in the cylinder block too. They can be a real ***** to get out. Usually it involves turning the motor over till the exhaust valve is closed (to stop debri getting into the cylinder) cutting through the nipple lengthwise as much as you can without damaging the threads in the block, and chiselling the rest out. There are threads on here describing the pain...

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Also the exhaust piping coming from the engine is pretty rusted on this tractor, I tried to back it out from one of the elbows with a pipe wrench and it broke off with the threaded section still inside the elbow. I didnt want to try closer to the engine and mess it up there. What would you guys recommend for this? Should I try and find a smaller diameter pipe to slip inside as a coupler? I would like to do a stack on this tractor anyway.

Here's what I would do. The pipe broke because it had eroded away most of the material in the inside.

Take a prick punch (like a center punch but instead of a 45° taper it is pointier.) and place it right at the edge between the elbow and the nipple. Choose a place where what remains of the nipple is the thinnest. Tap it with a hammer to separate the remains of the nipple from the elbow. You're bending it towards the center of the pipe. Work your way along the thread and eventually you'll loosen it enough to grab it with needle nose pliers and twist it out. Bending the remains if the inner threads like that reduces the diameter to where it will have no holding power.

But I wonder about the rest of the pipe. If it is similarly eroded, it does not provide a very good foundation for installing the stack. Of course you should be bracing the stack anyway so that may not matter.

Or you could weld an elbow to the existing elbow and mount the stack on that.

I would avoid restricting the pipe.

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Thanks for the help guys.

I was able to peel the pipe out strip by strip, hopefully the threads are going to be ok.

Mike I was suprised to see that in the manual too, and it was the original manual that came with the tractor hmmm. Still probably better not to anyway.

I am still working on that #$%^& hitch :) I am slowly making progress. I have only hit one finger with the sledge hammer so far lol.

Bevan

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I agree with both Hank and Mike. To take it a little farther, I would use plenty of penetrating oil...for days. Also, a Dremiel tool with a tungsten Carbide cutting bit #9902 is great for cutting from the inside and then using the chisel.

2009_0926ford640003.jpg

I used this method to cut some bearing races that would not punch out.. A bit tedious...but it gets the job done. :USA:

The top bit did work better. :)

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The transmission is all back together and I am going to call this project done!

Here are some photos of her all back together:

DSC01662.jpg

DSC01663.jpg

And my lovely hitch that has broken 3 G clamps, about 30 drill bits, Its been grilled on the BBQ, beaten with a sledge hammer, and a whole heap of other things. Without any lies I can say I have spent about 8 hours just on the hitch alone. Sometimes I am too stubborn. I will buy one off someone here soon :USA:

DSC01661.jpg

Thanks so much for everyones help, and Steve thanks for the step by step help too!

:)

Bevan

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bevan...my pleasure mate. The pictures of the clamps are priceless. :USA: But the Transmission looks absolutely fantastic. :) You did fine my friend. :wh:

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Bevan: You were very lucky to get Steve's undivided attention on your rebuild and you did an excellent job.

:)

If you have a friend with a welding torch (and or a shop you can go to) they should be able to get those remnants of the hitch pin out for you.

I recommend replacing the pin with an ag hitch pin . I think 3/4 inch 4 1/2 to five inches long will go in the hitch and you will be able to remove a lot easier if your need too! Lots of tractors has a variety of hitches that the ag type hitch pin will facilitate better than the originals.

The photo below shows one on a 1964 1054 tractor with a slot hitch and single pin hitch combined to use for different attachments.

102_5891.jpg

:USA:

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Hey there!,

I know it is late to post on this, but here is a fix for hubs and pulleys with damaged key ways that I learned from fixing other tractors and machines where replacement parts were unavailable or too expensive. If your key way is damaged you can often have a machine shop broach a second key way into the hub in another location, say 90 degrees out from the original key way, then just redrill and tap a new hole for a set screw above the new key way if there is enough meat on the part to do so, otherwise use the original set screw hole to secure the hub or pulley with a piece of square stock in the the old key way to prevent marring the shaft.

A local machine shop has rebroached key ways for me a number of times for a very reasonable price. McMaster Carr also carries the broaching tools for cutting key ways, and all you need is an arbor press to use them.

I hope this helps someone out!

Daniel

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I have a question that was not covered in this thread.

I have read this entire post and found it very informative and now I am not afraid to take my 4 speeds apart. :wh:

I have two of them and they both have the same problem. They like to pop out of 3rd gear. :thumbs:

Is this something that can be repaired or will I have to do a major overhall? Can I add to this thread or should I make a new one so I dont hijack this one when I start the repairs?

One is on a 633 and the other is on a 1055.

Thanks

Pat

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Pat...go ahead and start a new thread in the transmission section. It will be easier for people to download and follow. Popping out of third is a common problem, just have to see what those gear teeth look like. Ask any questions you want and we will help you. :thumbs:

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