Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
dgjks6

Let the restoration begin

Recommended Posts

I swear I could not make this stuff up.

So I have been watching transmissions on ebay. 2 C series 8 spds sold yesterday for $36 and $45. Did I bid on them? Of course not. I have one amlmost completely assembled in my garage.

So today I went to put the top half of the transmisison on and it gets stuck on the ball bearing where the axle comes out of the differential.

DSCF5160.jpg

The one on the right is 1/16 of an inch bigger than the one on the left.

No problem I can use the one on the left. Four bolts and a c-clip to change. I can do that in my sleep.

So I start the disassembly process and get the axle almost out and see this:

DSCF5167.jpg

this is the "good axle" from the original transmission. Its brother is the one in my avatar.

So this is what I have. Either that axle and wait for it to brake, or this one:

DSCF5165.jpg

DSCF5164.jpg

It came out of the second transmission. The gears are good, but the key way is messed up.

So I have 2 transmissions with 4 bad axles:

1 - cracked

1 - about to crack

1 - with a bad key wat

1 - with a groove worn in it and a stuck hub.

So what I have learned today:

Wheel horse made 2 differential housing sizes for 1 inch axles

and

I am an idiot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had a pair of axles I would gladly give them to you,Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am an idiot.

No, you are not an idiot. You are just another dedicated Horseman trying to learn as you go and make the best of what has been a series of, well, let's call it unlucky breaks! Be of good faith- you will win eventually!

Duff :thumbs:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost scored an axle today. JimD is restoring a c85 like mine and had some extra axles. Luckily he lives just down the street, so I went to meet him. Saw his stable. He has a bunch of great horses and a great workshop with all the toys. His c85 is light years ahead of mine, but I am going to keep going and try to catch him. Unfortunately the axles he had were an inch too short. Oh, well, the search continues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I have 2 transmissions with 4 bad axles:

and many good spare parts

and many new skills acquired

and working knowledge of two types of wheel horse transmissions

and many new tools which will be used in the future

and our respect for sticking with it ........

there's more I'm sure, but those are the ones that pop out in my mind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost scored an axle today. JimD is restoring a c85 like mine and had some extra axles. Luckily he lives just down the street, so I went to meet him. Saw his stable. He has a bunch of great horses and a great workshop with all the toys. His c85 is light years ahead of mine, but I am going to keep going and try to catch him. Unfortunately the axles he had were an inch too short. Oh, well, the search continues.

Greg. I must say it was a pleasure to meet you, and your attitude through all of this tells a much bigger story. You have a remarkable ability to "adapt". :thumbs:

Guys, dig deep into your parts piles and let's see if we can come up with the axles

Greg needs. His determination alone deserves our help. :D I'lll keep looking and watching your progress Greg. Best of luck.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, got the transmission back to together today. Could not find an axle so decided to use the one with the worn key way.

My brother came in town, and with a dremel, files, and JB weld we filled the hole and put in a new key way.

Wish me luck - I have my fingers crossed, but as always with my projects I expect it not to work.

Let you know tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish me luck - I have my fingers crossed, but as always with my projects I expect it not to work.

It always works --------------- if you did it right. Keep the chin up!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, we did. A little JB weld in the key way, a key and a hub with some oil on it. Let it sit overnight.

remove hub and key is in perfect position. Topped up the jb weld, let it dry, file it and put on the axle.

Now the trans is done.

Hub seems to be on tight. Sorry no pics today.

I am going to bolt the trans up this week and go from there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see this happen first hand but the next door neighbor had an axle damaged in a very similar way. He stated the keyway was repaired by a welder who fashioned a piece of "carbon" to the shape and width of the key. The "carbon" key was inserted in the axle and welded a filler bead in around the "carbon" key. "Carbon" key was then removed.

Like I said, I didn't see the process but I saw the result :thumbs: :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it is time for the weekend update.

Finally got the transmissin completed. Still need to put it back on the tractor with some tires. First I have to put back on the pulleys, etc.

No pics today, but I do have a cost update.

$5 for JB Weld

$117 for a dremel with accessories and a good digital dial gauge.

Spent the weekend with my brother organizing the garage and working on the axle. Got two work benches, a grinder, and a vice. Took them from my mom's house so they were free. Will get some pics tomorrow.

Here is a longer description of how we did the axle. My brother in an engineer and a perfectionist. We started with the new dial caliper and a file and got the rough spots on the axle filed down. The axle got to be perfecty round between .996 and .998 of an inch. There were a bunch of rough spots where the kay way was misshaped and the bolt to hold on the hub went in too far.

The cleaned out the inside of the hub until it was perfectly smooth. We were then able to slide on the hub (wth only a little force).

Then cleaned the keyway with the dremel. Filled with JB weld and put the key in. Then oiled the inside of the hub and slid it on. Let it sit on overnight to drive.

Pulled the hub off in the AM. Filled the rest of the keyway with JB weld. When it dried in the AM filed it smooth and put on the hub.

The only downside is that the key is now in the key way permanently. If it goes bad, I will have to perform the special transmission procedure I have developed where you disassemble the transmission with the axles in place.

So the final is

Day # 37

Disposables = $34

Parts = $300

Tools = $208

Bonding with my brother = priceless.

Pics of the trans and the garage to come tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On to the daily blog:

Day #38

these are pics of the garage before and after. I know it has nothing to do with the restoration, but the restoration made me feel like I finally deserve a work place instead of a cramped corner of the garage on a black and decker workmate

Before:

DSCF5156.jpg

After:

DSCF5228.jpg

DSCF5229.jpg

So I completed the transmission - almost

DSCF5227.jpg

And I wanted to install the rear wheels so I could move the tractor from this position:

DSCF5230.jpg

I have a set of 23x10.5x12's from a 520 that I used with chains in the winter to plow. One tire kept going flat so I decided to remove it and put in a tube ($22). But as every story goes, it took a lot to get the tire off. I could almost make a post of that. When the tire came off I found this:

DSCF5225.jpg

and this:

DSCF5226.jpg

Water must have gotten inside the rim and started to rust it, so I sanded and sanded and then sprayed it with rust reformer. I also found out what they used to mount the tire before. Cow manure. Really. The inside of that tire smelled so bad that I had to clean the inside of it with bleach so I could put it back in the garage. My wife blamed me and the hot sauce we had with chicken for dinner the other night (if you have never eaten Barberton chicken you have to try it) but I swear it was the tire.

Anyway - here is part of the finished product - with the silver compared to a stock wheel horse silver rim. It's pretty close:

DSCF5235.jpg

DSCF5234.jpg

Also I learned I have to be more patient. Instead of getting out teh compressor and blowing off the dust, I just used a rag to wipe it down. The silver paint trapped the dust in all the corners. I decided to leave it as a lesson to myself. Every time I look at the rim I will remember to slow down and do things correctly.

By the way, is this crack bad? It is only on the outside if the rim. On this inside in as intact weld.

DSCF5233.jpg

Later all

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't even tell it is cracked in your picture. Looks like some sort of factory seam to me. If it is not all the way through, I wouldn't worry about it to much. By the way you are doing a real good job and the chicken comments cracked me up. :thumbs: You are going to have her back on her feet in no time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always look forward to reading your posts. You're almost there, and I find myself once again applauding you and your resolve and desire to finish this project right. Keep up the good work :thumbs: brother. My time to be doing this type of job is coming soon. I have learned a lot reading about your project. Thank you!

Dave

Lagrange, Ohio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Day #43

Put last coat of paint on the rim this AM before work. Waiting for paint to dry is kind of like, well, watching paint dry.

Costs so far, added $22 for a tube. I think I am going to only put a tube in this tire since the other is still inflated from the winter. I do have to sand and paint that rim though.

Disposables = $34

Parts = $322

Tools = $208

Just a quick question. I just used spray enamel on the rim. It does not seem that durable. Is that what you guys use or should I have found something better?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't have a paint gun to spray automotive type paints, the enamel spray bomb is just fine some brands hold up better than others, but I will not start that issue, use what you've been using and if it fails try something different next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we last left our hero (me) - we had just completed a transmission and started on the tires. Well, here is my update (and sorry, no more good stories yet - this went smooth)

We finished one rim - not near the quality I was expecting and I had my crew start on the other rim:

DSCF5295.jpg

Then we removed the hood and lights and started to sand that:

DSCF5296.jpg

DSCF5297.jpg

The hood is actually pretty straight in a few places. No metal work going to be done. Just sanding and painting. It is amazing how fast an orbital sander and a dremel work compared to a piece of sand paper and my hand.

The headlight bracket was broken so I go a new one for $17

Sand paper and masks = $31 of disppsables

So the update so far is:

Day #45

Parts = $339

Tools = $208

Disposables = $65

to be continued...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So now to the next major project - the engine. I may start another thread there depending on the response here.

I have decided to rebuild the k181 - if possible - get the tractor runnning, and then I will be a pro so I can then swap out for a bigger motor if needed and sell the prefect k181 for a million dollars and pay for the whole restoration.

But first a little background. When I got the tractor the motor was blown.

The rod was in pieces and the cam was cracked:

DSCF5303.jpg

so I got a new (used) cam

DSCF5304.jpg

When I took the bearing plate off I cracked it

DSCF5299.jpg

I have since acquired 2 other bearing plates:

DSCF5302.jpg

The crank is messed up

DSCF5298.jpg

and measures

DSCF5305.jpg

The cylinder is smooth excpet for this rust spot

DSCF5307.jpg

and some wear by the valves

DSCF5309.jpg

and measures

DSCF5310.jpg

So here are the questions:

1 - can it be saved?

2 - can I get the crankshaft ground and get a bigger crank?

3 - do I need to bore the cylinder - has it been done before and what size piston do I need?

Let me know what you think

And then the fun will start.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could take your crank and block to a machine shop and get a estimate on what needs or can be done,Rick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is actually shop by me called "Northhanpton crankshaft". They want $90 to turn the crank, but I don't know how to tell if there is already too much damage to it.

Still thinking about the block.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a gew days of research I think it is going to cost at least $400 (with a new muffler) to get this thing running.

Not sure if I want to invest this just for the experience. I am considering getting something to pull the 48 inch deck I have.

Any engine recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's this guy in Indiana that still might have some engines for sale that might fit your needs. whfan74? You still have a stock of those fine motors? If you can get one of those motors DG, you'd be set.

Dave

Lagrange, Ohio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×