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Suburban 550

No Wonder Why It Wouldn't Run

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You mean I been drinkin' methanol ? I thought that was shine!

I'am gonna' need some salami to wash this down!

Live in N/W Pa. we have winter/summer formulas.

Some stations sell gas, some gas w/10% ethanol!

Who knows what yer gittin'!

I rember... back in the day...before gov. regs.

Gas was, reg 98 octane, preimum 100, super 103 or 104 octane!

Stuff was Rosey Pink, the smell could knock a buzzard off a crap wagon!

I do recall if gas sat a very long time it smelled like varnish!

Ohhh well what's a kid to do?

:D HORSEFEATHERS!

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I opened up the carb from the Commando 8 engine today and found this in it. Man, this stuff gets around..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sausage-people2.jpeg

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Definitely looks like something you see in a bowl. 

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Fella that does all the engine rework on my friends fleet of equipment swore off Stabil and said to use Starbrite...

Blue stuff.

I have seen it at Napa and TSC.

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I opened up the carb from the Commando 8 engine today and found this in it. Man, this stuff gets around..

 

 

 

sausage-people2.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

humerous.jpg

 

Ahhhh, bringing back the good ole days, aye Jim?

Edited by Save Old Iron
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Ahhhh, bringing back the good ole days, aye Jim?

 Yea, got to thinking about some of the laughs we had in the past. :)

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When I store something, I not only use Stabil, but I run the carb out of fuel. If I can I will drain the fuel bowl also. The alcohol in our gas absorbs water and will ruin a carburetor very quickly. 

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I know it's added cost, but I get all of my small engine fuel at the local airport. The 100LL fuels will setup for yrs. don't worry about it getting nasty in the tank an clogging up the carb, plus it smells good too...... My 2 cents

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If your running plane fuel it's not made to run at low altitudes

Starbrite is good I use and bio stabilizer

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Aviation fuel is simply higher octane than what you can get at the pumps. Carburetors are what is use to make altitude adjustments. It has to do with the air to fuel ratio. The higher you go the richer you have to mix the fuel. That's why there is a mixture control and a carburetor heat control in airplanes. You can't blend that in fuel. Aviation fuel has no alcohol in it as alcohol will absorb water and if it gets in aviation fuel it will freeze at higher altitudes.    

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100LL runs great on the surface. It does contain an anti-icing agent though.

I have been flying planes for several yrs(17,300hrs) an have never seen the fuel perform any different down low.

The talulyne that it contains works really well keeping water out(anti-icing), an it keeps the fuel from going sour.

I have been running all of my small engines on it for 8yrs now, an the only problem I have had is just deposits on the plugs.

With the 100LL my engines seem to start really easy too, I also use Aeroshell air cooled oils, formulated for aircooled engines

As far as altitude. Air gets thinner the higher you go, the mixture control is used to reduce fuel flow for the lack of oxygen at high altitudes with a naturally asperated engine. With the Turbocharged aircraft,they have the ability of making their own manifold pressure so altitude an mixture control don't bother them as bad.

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17,300 hours? That's 721 twenty four hour days or 2,183 eight hour shifts. I am 78 years old and been around planes most of my life. I don't know any commercial airline pilots with that kind of history. ????????????????????????

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I'm not an airline pilot...There is no money in that,unless you are a 15yr capitan with one of the name brand airlines. Being a greyhound bus driver with wings, never appealed to me at all..... They are limited in how many hrs a week they can be at the controls.

I started flying with a private pilot license before I had a drivers license at 16. Flying is all I could think about(still is).

Flying Ag planes 800-1100 hrs a yr, an Corprate Charter around )350-500hrs a yr now!...:)

Flew a lot of pipeline patrol in C-150-172 yrs ago, an volunteer CAP pilot........ Get a lot of hrs in slow poke planes like that.

If your fimiliar with aviation, you know what Part:135 on demand Air charter is, unlike Part:121 Comercial scheduled air-carrier, there are not very many constraints on time.

This time of yr, I haul a lot of cargo....... Baby chickens from Mexico to Michigan an Ohio. Car parts heading back south.

On the weekends, me an my 8yr old terarize the sky's around the house here in a citabria or my Mooney... Every other weekend in the summer time, I tow gliders up at the local glider port.....:) Trying this new thing with Wheelhorses now!!!!! Maybe it will keep us on the ground more?..:)

Hope that helped you Km3h

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My first time was in 1948 or 49 in a 1946 TaylorCraft. I was 14 at the time. No radio, almost no anything. Turn and bank, compass, altimeter, and a few other odds and ends. My Step Dad owned a lot of different aircraft over the years. Some were military. One was a B25 which is what he flew in the Army Air Force during WW2. We flew all over the country. He was the first person to get  a private helicopter license in the state of Maryland. Took a course on the GI bill. He held every rating the FAA issued at the time of his death. I loved that TailorCraft. It was a very forgiving aircraft. Big wide wings. Not fast but economical to operate and it would always get you there. That's the plane I learned to do slide slips in as that was the only way to land at the old Rutherford Airport here near Baltimore unless you wanted to come in high over the power lines and then dip right down to the runway. Your choice depending on the weather conditions and wind direction.  Lot of stories but that's for another time.

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