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I like the method mentioned where you prime the rims, mount the tire but don't inflate them, mask the tires leaving a space between the tire and the rim and paint. When the paints dry, just fill the tires, no damage to the paint.

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Wheelbearing,

Were you successful in obtaining new decals for your project. I am doing a similar project to my 50th anniversary 520H and some of the key decals are discontinued.

Thanks

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well I have some progress in paint but still waiting on the platters on the holiday. I really can't asemble much till I have the hardware.

IMG_3793.jpg

More painting

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Thats my main stay in the garage the wood stove. never be able to do anything with out it. I open the bay for air and the rear door for through flow.

IMG_3792.jpg

Next is the tins on this bad boy.

IMG_3790.jpg

what is the normal Compresion on a good running 20hp onan 120 PSI ?

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Nice restore man. Way better looking than the rebuild i did a few weeks ago. ANyway, before the rebuild we got 30/110 PSI on the Onan and after the rebuild we got 120/120, so i think 120 is good for compression.

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Heres the gold back from the Platters. Fresh Zinc with yellow chromate.

They did all this for $65

That is amazing! If the plater has a website, post it here and I'll add it to the links, us Connecticut (area) folks could use that!

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No web site for the Plater. But the Name is Bass platting in Bloomfield,Ct.

Its up next to Kaman Helicopter on rt 305.

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Love that plating work and heck for that price you got yourself one mighty fine deal!

Restore on the tractor is looking very impressive! :thumbs:

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:WRS: :thumbs: That looks really sharp!

Keep up the great work! :banghead:

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Like the plating idea, might have to steel it. Looking real good.

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Rob,

See you worked a late nite poasting at 3am !! :thumbs:

I couldn't stop it was so addicting. :banghead:

Today I need to get my butt outside and blast the rear rims and the rest of the tins.

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Awesome job!! Can't wait to see it all done.

I work in the heavy tire industry and one of the procedures for protecting rims is to completely coat the inside of the wheels with "Freylube". Most big truck and equipment fleets use this stuff on all their single and multi-piece wheels. It protects the inside from corrosion. Especially in an application like these tractors where the tires can stay mounted for years. This is also a big problem for fire departments because they don't wear out tires that often.

As far as tubes goes, it is just a container to hold air pressure on multi wheels and non-butyl linerless tires. When the tube is inflated it is pressed so tight against the inner liner that any puncture will take the tube out of service as well. If you have a huge problem with punctures then you can "solid fill" them with Arnco rubber resin. The tires will weigh about 30-50 extra pounds each and have the same deflection of a pneumatic fill but will never ever go flat. When the tires wear out, you cut them off the rims in two parts.

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Awesome job!! Can't wait to see it all done.

I work in the heavy tire industry and one of the procedures for protecting rims is to completely coat the inside of the wheels with "Freylube". Most big truck and equipment fleets use this stuff on all their single and multi-piece wheels. It protects the inside from corrosion. Especially in an application like these tractors where the tires can stay mounted for years. This is also a big problem for fire departments because they don't wear out tires that often.

As far as tubes goes, it is just a container to hold air pressure on multi wheels and non-butyl linerless tires. When the tube is inflated it is pressed so tight against the inner liner that any puncture will take the tube out of service as well. If you have a huge problem with punctures then you can "solid fill" them with Arnco rubber resin. The tires will weigh about 30-50 extra pounds each and have the same deflection of a pneumatic fill but will never ever go flat. When the tires wear out, you cut them off the rims in two parts.

I was also told about a mounting lube for installing the valve stem and setting the bead.

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WOW!!!!!!! WOW!!!!!!! WOW!!!!!!

You my friend are a FANTASTIC welder....

I bet you could weld a bolt to my ass if I could stand the heat!!!

Love the plating idea, and pretty much everything else about the job, but especially the Bud Light :thumbs:

BRAVO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Certain mounting lubes are soap based and corrosive. On top of the fact they'll dry out and then it will be next to impossible to break the bead after some time. Google Europaste mounting lube. High tech stuff. It's much better than regular mounting lube and it's not that expensive. Freylube is just a rim anti-rust agent. It will protect those nice wheels you have from the inside.

Take your new tires and put them in the warm sun for a bit then coat the inside of the rims and valve stem with freylube (use a brass high pressure screw in stem, they never leak). Next lube the beads on the tires with mounting lube and with little effort and technique you can pop them on the wheels with no damage to the finish.

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