Jump to content
HorseFixer

Question On Changing Oil In Hydro

Recommended Posts

it seems to me that all of the oil systems I've ever looked at had some kind of suction screen before the oil pump, with hydraulic systems usually using a smaller mesh size, modern engines filter the oil before it goes thru the engine, thus the need for a bypass in case the filter clogs or won't filter the oil due to a viscosity issue. hydraulic filters are in the return to tank line and only have the amount of pressure that their restriction applies to the system. hydraulic systems are inherently cleaner than engines because they dont pump air and are not contaminated with combustion by products like unburned fuel and carbon particles.

when it comes to filters if the inlet holes have a greater surface area than the outlet area they should all flow at the same rate providing that the filter media has the same flow capabilities.

is it more important to change the filter than the fluid? :thumbs:

just my thoughts on the topic :wh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I was to critical on the Antidrain valve that was needed. :) Maybe it doesnt need one after all :hide: the main point of my dissasembly was to state "Stay With A Wheel Horse Filter" As far as oil, I use AMSOIL fully synthetic 4 stroke engine oil 10-w30/ 30 weight. It pours down to 50 degrees below zero when conventional oil Frezzes solid as a Brick! I guess thats why I can start my tractor right up in 20 below throw it in forward and not wait to warm it up to move it! Do that to many times with conventional oil and you will buck yer tranny up. :WRS:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doubt if many are still looking at this but here are a few thoughts. When Dextron ( read GM ) first came out it was to smooth out the shifting in automatics trans instead of a jerky shift. Ford ( for a time at least ) type F fluid retained that jerk. Now whether the jerk resulted from a heavier viscosity or a grittyness in the fluid I don't know. But it may make sense that type F might be a grabbier fluid than Dextron if your machine is showing signs of age. Lot easier to change fluid than changing a hydro and at least staying with an auto trans fluid might be the first logical route. Following along similar lines, motor oil may be better for older units because of the increased viscosity. As far as zinc goes, its my understanding from my old motorcycle racing days that zinc really doesn't come into play unless as a last resort to protect the engine. Doesn't do much until then. Some m/c oils still retain more zinc than car oils as well as the diseal oils such as Rotella and Mobil if thats a concern. An online search can explain how much is in each brand.

Finally I have a D-180 that had Dextron when I bought it. I've continued to use Dextron and the car filter that was in it on subsequent oil changes. Its showing its age a bit and I was going to change to the motor oil that may have been in it since new. Then again, there seems to be a difference of opinion whether it was in since new since the year may have made a difference. If it wasn't snowing here in NE PA I might try it now. Maybe in the spring.

These comments and a buck might get you a cup of coffee ( not Starbucks however )

Nate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I am ready to change the fluid in my GT14 Hydro. It turns out that it has ATF rather than oil. I had hoped to use some 0w-30w synthetic I picked up on sale earlier this summer. But having read through this thread I am a bit gun shy. 

I have removed the cylinders and have all new Lines and fittings. 

Since this topic is has aged a bit, has anyone switched? Positive or negative results?

Finally, if I stay with ATF, which synthetic ATF should I use? Mobil 1 or ?? 

I like Synthetics and realize it may be overkill but if it offers any benefit it's worth it to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you mean 10w-30? I think 0w may be too thin for the hydro.

I have read several people who have successfully changed to motor oil, just be sure to change it again fairly soon after running it for a bit to get rid of the residue that will still be in the pump, lift cylinder, and valves.

Seems to be a personal preference thing, no real evidence to show one is better than another for this application.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done some research and I am no oil viscosity expert but...

ATF viscosity is thinner than oil. Broad brush wise.

The Zero in 0w-30w basically indicated its viscosity at cold temperature. 

I will assume it is basically 30w oil that does not thicken when cold.

The only issue may be if one wants the pump to create heat when used in colder temps. I am not knowledgeable enough to know whether this is the case with Tractor Hydros.

i agree with your thought that no harm should come from switching and had also come to the conclusion to swap out the first changed fluid after some use to purge the last vestiges of ATF out.

the price of the Mobile 1 synthetic 0w-30w is about half that of Synthetic ATF. 

I think I am going to give it a go unless someone has information that proves my assumptions false.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is hard to find anything specific. For the most part any oil seems to be ok depending on extremes of environmental temps one might work the Hydro in.

I was able to find a JD manual that allowed 0w-40 synthetic.

image.thumb.jpg.cd790e9653789390d72f864d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My .02. Do not put synthetic oil in an old Sundstrand transmission. Chances are it will leak like a sieve.  Just finished replacing all seals and gaskets in one somebody did that to. Put conventional 10w-30 back in...no leaks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be too expensive for me to change over all my horses to synthetics.  Even if I only had a a couple I wouldn't bother.  i am sure Synthetics are somewhat better than dead dinosaurs but those dead things kept these horses working for 40-50 years and are a lot cheaper than the synthetic stuff. I would rather invest in more frequent changes of fluids. to get rid of water and other junk....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/7/2015 at 10:12 AM, oldredrider said:

My .02. Do not put synthetic oil in an old Sundstrand transmission. Chances are it will leak like a sieve.  Just finished replacing all seals and gaskets in one somebody did that to. Put conventional 10w-30 back in...no leaks.

 

That Is Not Correct!   :(  AMSOIL actually has ingredients to keep the seals pliable, but is highly detergent and cleans sludge that causes a (FALSE SEAL).   If your engine seal or tranny is using DINO OIL that oil actually makes seals hard and brittle.

 

MYTH: Synthetic oil can cause oil leaks

VERDICT:  FALSE

When synthetic motor oils were first introduced in the 1970s, they were known to cause the seals in the car engine to shrink, resulting in motor oil leakage. Many advancements in synthetic oil technology have been made in the last 30+ years and this myth has officially been debunked! Today’s synthetic oil does not cause seals to shrink and thus does not trigger leaks. Having said that, using a synthetic oil in an older car (i.e. a car that is around 15+ years old) may cause leaks because the cleansing properties of the synthetic oil might clean sludge off the seals that was acting as a blocker for unknown cracks. If you drive a vehicle with close to or over 75,000 miles, you might want to consider high-mileage oil.

 

https://www.pepboys.com/car_care_corner/car_care_basics/maintenance/oil_myths/

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×