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ebinmaine

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ebinmaine last won the day on September 23

ebinmaine had the most liked content!

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About ebinmaine

  • Rank
    Not quite on-center
  • Birthday 12/10/1970

Wheel Horse Information

  • tractors
    1974 B80-4, 1974 C160-8, 1267, 1974/5 C100,
    Home made JD "M" tribute baby farm tractor.

    Partial Caretaker of my Honey's 657.
  • favoritemodel
    1974 B80

Profile Information

  • Location
    Hiram Maine
  • Occupation
    Truck driver & Crane operator
  • Interests
    My Wonderful girl. Hiking. Being outdoors. Old trucks, tractors, cars etc... Anything shiny gets my attention.

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. 1611 Transmission Pulley

    Yeah... That price was crazy! How about $40 shipped (in the USA) ?
  2. New member, new rj58

  3. Well folks. We're at the stage of the game where there's nothing left to do but degrease and throw a quick coat of paint on the transmission and put some seals in it. Also put some paint on the engine. Then... Reassembly begins.
  4. @pfrederi and @953 nut She's up and running and starts on her own power and sounds great but is not charging. Can you give me a DVOM usable test that I can do to determine if it is the generator not putting out or the regulator not putting out?
  5. True Story ************* Rreeeeeeeeelllyyyyyyyyy.........
  6. Volt meter reading

    Yes. That's why I like using the I terminal. If you use the A terminal or the lamps terminal you only have power when it is in the Run position and that does not give you a voltage reading when the engine is turning over before it starts on its own.
  7. Volt meter reading

    It definitely sounds to me like you're doing something that should work. It's important that you take that with a grain of salt however. Both of the wiring on both of the tractors were hand done by me. Not following Factory diagrams. The only real question I have about the way that you want to wire things up is that on my tractor's which are B and C Series, the I post on the ignition switch is under power anytime the key is turned from the off position. Maybe d-series don't work like that. Still, you should be perfectly fine
  8. Nice catch on the zip ties Paul. What I did was wire brush a small patch on the casing of the generator and also on the feet of the regulator. Due to the fuel pump spewing gasoline all over the general vicinity I have not tested for voltage yet. Once I determine whether or not this regulator is putting out the appropriate voltage I'll get a couple of large metal hose clamps to wrap around the entire housing.
  9. Volt meter reading

    I wouldn't have used the accessory or lamps position because those are not on all the time anyways. I would want something that would give an indication of the voltage both while you are trying to start the tractor and while it is in the regular run position. I would assume that the oil gauge feed from the ignition I post would be for the lamp in that gauge? If that is the case, you should be good to go.
  10. Volt meter reading

    I don't have a PTO on either one of the tractors that I've wired. So I don't have a PTO safety switch obviously. It sounds like you have all your ducks in a row though.
  11. Volt meter reading

    Bo, you absolutely CAN tie that end with the hour meter ground but be careful about combining grounds because it gives you one place for two things to fail if it corrodes. Just be sure to remove the ground of the hour meter completely and brush or sand off the terminals and bolts and contact points before you put it back together. As to where to connect the light bulb. I've put two of these voltmeters in tractors I've built and I tied the light bulb to the same place I tied the voltmeter itself. That way when you turn the ignition key to the on position, and also to the start position, the voltmeter and the light are both always available.
  12. going to be a few days before I get time to mess around with this thing very much but I'll check that out. I have the carburetor of this engine soaking and waiting to be cleaned out and then I'll be able to address the bad hoses and hopefully repair this valve, possibly replace it. We are already two winters ahead on firewood so this log splitter is not exactly a priority but I do need to get it done and setting to storage.
  13. I believe that to be true. The guy had no notion of the age of the machine but he figured it was at least 20 years old. The engine that is on there is a 6.5 horsepower Briggs industrial commercial that he put on. I think it's maybe around a 2012. He had been using it for a few seasons by that point already. And it was old when he got it. The guy was using it to split the butt ends of the logs that he got for free from his boss. It's quite powerful. We had noticed that here as well. In our case it turns out not to matter because we never move the collar back any further than what it is. Definitely would be an issue for some other owners though.
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